Areas of Practice Guide

The Areas of Practice Guide is a collection of tools and resources from AAPA and its partners to help PAs make the most of their careers, whether they are just starting out or are seeking to make a career transition.

Read more about PA career flexibility and changing specialties.

Use the drop-down menu to navigate among specialties and career tracks.

Overview

Administration Overview

As administrators, PAs are on the front lines of leading a changing healthcare landscape as well as contributing to a more collaborative, team-based system. PAs in Administration utilize leadership and management competencies above and beyond their clinical skill set to positively impact patient care. They are aspiring or current experts in the business of medicine, clinical quality, compliance, staffing, and revenue cycle management.

In the 2018 AAPA Salary Survey, 1.2% of PAs reported that their primary role was administrator or manager. According to the 2018 PA and NP Workplace Experiences National Summary Report from CHLM, 17% of PAs and NPs surveyed reported they were in a formal leadership role at their place of employment and 27% were in an informal leadership role. The 2020 AAPA Salary Survey did not break out administration as a role but included PAs in administration as respondents who are not in clinical practice.

Compensation

Median compensation in 2019 among PAs in administration was $140,000. This includes all forms of base compensation, including base salary, annualized hourly wage, and base compensation based on productivity. It does not include bonus. Among PAs in administration, 52.1% received a bonus, and of PAs who reported receiving one, the median bonus was $10,000.

For customized information on compensation by state, specialty, work setting, and years of experience, in addition to benefits, please check out the interactive AAPA Salary Report.

Dermatology Overview

According to the 2020 AAPA Salary Report, 3.6% of PAs practice in dermatology.

Dermatology offers PAs the opportunity to evaluate, diagnose, and treat a wide variety of skin-related health conditions, both medically and surgically. They also provide screening exams, preventive care, and education for patients and their families. Building on their broad medical training, most PAs learn the specifics of dermatology practice while they are working in the clinical setting. Most work autonomously within a dermatology office, much like a staff dermatologist, seeing a wide range of medical, surgical, and cosmetic patients.

After graduation, PAs receive additional postgraduate education in dermatology by attending professional dermatology meetings, tumor boards, dermatology grand rounds, and self-study courses.

Some PAs in dermatology focus only on medical dermatology, while others concentrate on surgery or aesthetics. For many PAs in dermatology, their practice includes pediatric and adult medical dermatology, surgery, and aesthetics. In a private dermatology office, the day-to-day work includes reviewing lab and biopsy results, following up on prior authorizations for specific medications, visits with pharmaceutical sales reps, and a schedule chock-full of patient visits. Dermatology is a very procedure-based specialty that routinely includes biopsies, wide excisions, cryotherapy, and an array of other procedures in the office. Some PAs also perform aesthetic procedures such as dermal fillers, neuromodulators, lasers, micro-needling, and peels.

PAs who choose dermatology in most cases can be assured of a busy schedule, but one that is predictable with typical workday hours and no call.

Compensation

Median compensation in 2019 among PAs in dermatology was $109,500. This includes all forms of base compensation, including base salary, annualized hourly wage, and base compensation based on productivity. It does not include bonus. Among PAs in dermatology, 47% received a bonus, and of PAs who reported receiving one, the median bonus was $20,000.

For customized information on compensation by state, specialty, work setting, and years of experience, in addition to benefits, please check out the interactive AAPA Salary Report.

Education Overview

According to the 2020 AAPA Salary Report, about 2% of PAs work as full-time PA program faculty with 81% arriving directly from clinical practice; many precepted PA students. Two-thirds of PA program faculty continue to practice an average of 11.6 hours per week, according to the 2020 Physician Assistant Education Association (PAEA) Faculty & Directors Report.

Compensation

PAEA’s Faculty & Directors Report lists mean compensation for full-time PA faculty in 2019 at nearly $99,000, with the median at $97,000. Additional information about faculty compensation and university benefits is available in the report.

Rewards and Challenges

PA educators train the nation’s future healthcare providers in the 267 accredited PA programs across the country, in both the didactic and clinical phases of the curriculum. PAs become educators for a variety of reasons. Some have a passion for teaching and always knew they would become an educator. Some are looking for new challenges including research and other scholarly work. Others say training the new generation of PAs is a way of giving back to the profession and benefitting society long into the future.

When asked how to prepare for a career change to education, PA program faculty and program directors offer the following advice:

  • Gain as much exposure to academia as possible to inform your decision making. Learn about adult education theory, best teaching practices, and current theory in assessment.
  • Try teaching as a preceptor, adjunct faculty, or guest lecturer to see if you like teaching before committing to full-time academia. Some PA programs offer training in clinical education to preceptors who are thinking of teaching didactic courses. Teaching in the didactic year offers prospective educators experience in the nuts and bolts of preparing and delivering a presentation to students, a crucial skill for PA educators.
  • Serve as a guest lecturer to gain exposure to teaching without the administrative responsibilities of full-time faculty. Consider team teaching with an experienced faculty member.
  • Most PAs find that taking education classes on curriculum design and implementation, or at least teaching adult learners, is critical in helping them with the transition from clinical practice to teaching.
  • A master’s degree is almost always required – in fact, nearly 98% of faculty have one, according to PAEA’s Faculty & Directors report. Some PA programs hire faculty who are in the process of completing an advanced degree.
  • Keep your NCCPA certification current. Often, but not always, it is a hiring requirement.
  • Do not assume that you will work fewer hours. While there may be more flexibility than in a clinical job, education is not a 9-to-5 job. Faculty may have to be on campus from 9-to-5, but most work in the evenings and during the weekends, because days are filled with classroom time, program and university meetings, and student interactions. One of the most common challenges new faculty experience is how much work they have to do at home.
  • Spend time in a PA department to get a feel for day-to-day expectations

Emergency Medicine Overview

According to the 2020 AAPA Salary Report, 9.3% of PAs practice in emergency medicine, making it the third most popular specialty for PAs.

According to the 2020 AAPA Salary Report, PAs who practice emergency medicine as their major specialty area earned more than PAs in other major specialty areas ($124,100) although some surgical subspecialties are paid far more than emergency medicine.

Compensation

Median compensation in 2019 among PAs in emergency medicine was $124,100. This includes all forms of base compensation, including base salary, annualized hourly wage, and base compensation based on productivity. It does not include bonus. Among PAs in emergency medicine, 54.9% received a bonus, and of PAs who reported receiving one, the median bonus was $8,000.

For customized information on compensation by state, specialty, work setting, and years of experience, in addition to benefits, please check out the interactive AAPA Salary Report.

Family Medicine Overview

According to the 2020 AAPA Salary Report, 14.1% of PAs practice in family medicine, making it the most popular specialty for PAs.

While family medicine is the most popular specialty for PAs, primary care (defined as family medicine, general internal medicine, and general pediatrics) is the lowest-paid major specialty area ($105,000) according to the 2020 AAPA Salary Report. The median compensation for PAs in all specialties in 2019 was $111,000.

Compensation

Median compensation in 2019 among PAs in family medicine was $105,000. This includes all forms of base compensation, including base salary, annualized hourly wage, and base compensation based on productivity. It does not include bonus. Among PAs in family medicine, 53% received a bonus, and of PAs who reported receiving one, the median bonus was $7,000.

For customized information on compensation by state, specialty, work setting, and years of experience, in addition to benefits, please check out the interactive AAPA Salary Report.

Rewards & Challenges

The rewards of practicing family medicine include providing comprehensive care to the same patients over time, developing relationships with patients and their families, addressing a wide range of conditions, emphasizing prevention, providing continuity of care, maintaining skills and learning new ones, teaching and sharing knowledge, and learning and growing.

The many and deep rewards of family medicine must be balanced against the challenges, which include workload and time pressures; overhead and income inequities; difficulty accessing specialists, procedures, tests, and other resources; paperwork, telephone calls, and forms; maintaining and acquiring skills and knowledge; patients’ expectations; and liability fears.

Despite the challenges, over the 50-plus years of the profession, family medicine has always been – and still remains – the most frequently chosen specialty among PAs.

Hospital Medicine Overview

According to the 2020 AAPA Salary Report, 3.1% of PAs practice in hospital medicine.

A hospital medicine service provides general medical care for hospitalized patients. The hospital medicine team coordinates care for inpatients. The hospitalist physicians or PAs may examine patients as they are admitted, ordering X-rays, diagnostic tests, and other lab work. They examine test results, order treatments and medical services, and prescribe medications. For example, a PA may order respiratory therapy for a patient with pneumonia or antibiotics for a patient with a kidney infection.

Many patients that end up in the hospital have complicated cases. They could have multiple health conditions occurring at once, making the hospital medicine service essential to their recovery. Unlike specialists that work solely with one organ system or a certain patient demographic, the hospital medicine team sees it all.

Hospitalists help manage patients medically through the continuum of hospital care, often seeing patients in the emergency room, following them into the critical care unit, and arranging for discharge. Physicians who become hospitalists typically have taken specialty boards in internal medicine, family medicine, or pediatrics. PAs who choose hospital medicine tend to come from general internal medicine or an internal medicine subspecialty. The percent of hospital medicine services employing PAs has been on the rise. In 2007, about 30 percent of hospital medicine practices included PAs. By 2017, about 70 percent of hospitalist groups were hiring PAs.

There are varied roles for PAs on hospital medicine services. On some services, a physician and PA split a panel of patients. Each cares for their share, including daily visits, progress notes, calling consults, discharges, discharge summaries, procedures, billing, etc. The physician follows up on patients seen by the PA, if needed. This system allows the team to see more patients and provides backup and redundancy for both team members when the patient acuity gets high. A variation on this model gives the PA a more independent role, and a hospitalist physician sees the patient every third day.

Some PAs in hospital medicine manage observation units or lower acuity observation patients. In those cases, typically PAs provide all of the care, with a physician available for backup.

PAs often fill a vital role of hospitalist services by managing late afternoon and early evening admissions, getting patients onto the service and starting diagnostic work-ups and treatment plans. A hospitalist physician evaluates the patient the next day. This model is efficient for the physicians and hospital. The downside is possible job dissatisfaction for the PA, unless they rotate through this function and have other hospital medicine responsibilities.

Some critical access hospitals use PAs in a very independent role, staffing these hospitals at night. Smaller, rural hospitals with aging medical staff have learned to maximize the scope of practice of their PAs to remain viable and provide care for inpatients. The growing use of telemedicine offers another avenue for physician backup in this setting.

Compensation

Median compensation in 2019 among PAs in hospital medicine was $110,000. This includes all forms of base compensation, including base salary, annualized hourly wage, and base compensation based on productivity. It does not include bonus. Among PAs in hospital medicine, 35% received a bonus, and of PAs who reported receiving one, the median bonus was $5,000.

For customized information on compensation by state, specialty, work setting, and years of experience, in addition to benefits, please check out the interactive AAPA Salary Report.

Internal Medicine Overview

According to the 2020 AAPA Salary Report, 5.1% of PAs practice in general internal medicine. Internal medicine is the diagnosis, treatment, and care of adults, ranging from healthy individuals to those with complex illnesses. PAs in internal medicine solve common and complex health issues. They provide long-term, comprehensive care in the office or the hospital, in all areas of medicine, including:

  • Disease prevention
  • Wellness and health promotion
  • Women’s health
  • Treatment involving the cardiac, pulmonary, gastrointestinal, neurologic, nervous systems, etc.
  • Mental health
  • Addiction

Providers of general internal medicine handle a wide spectrum of illnesses affecting adults. They are experts in diagnosis, in the treatment of chronic illnesses, in health promotion, and in disease prevention. They are not limited to one type of medical problem or organ system. PAs in general internal medicine often treat patients with multiple conditions or diseases and those taking multiple medications; therefore, they must know about multiple disease processes and polypharmacology.

PAs in general internal medicine often serve as primary care providers. The main difference between internal medicine and family medicine is that internal medicine focuses on adults and the adult medicine subspecialties, while family practices care for patients across the lifespan, including adolescents, children, and newborns.

General internal medicine providers have a broad scope of practice. They typically:

    • Treat internal disorders, such as hypertension, heart disease, diabetes, or problems of the lung, brain, kidney, or gastrointestinal tract.
    • Prescribe or administer medication, therapy, and other specialized medical care to treat or prevent illness, disease, or injury.
    • Explain procedures and discuss test results or prescribed treatments with patients.
    • Manage and treat common health problems, such as infections, influenza or pneumonia, as well as serious, chronic, and complex illnesses, in adults.
    • Analyze records, reports, test results, or examination information to diagnose medical condition of patient.

    PAs who choose to practice in general internal medicine should enjoy caring for adults from young adulthood through geriatric years. They often will care for patients for many years, offering the opportunity to develop a strong personal connect with patients over the course of their lives. They should enjoy a wide variety of patients. Some days they may see a patient with a cold followed by someone with a cancer diagnosis. They may have conversations ranging from basic preventive care to multiple chronic issues or end-of-life preferences. General internal medicine providers perform some procedures, but usually do not perform surgery. General internal medicine practice tends to have typical workday hours (8-5).

    Some internal medicine outpatient practices conduct inpatient rounds, but these days, most inpatients are cared for by hospitalists, providers in general internal medicine who practice solely in the inpatient setting.

    Compensation

    Median compensation in 2019 among PAs in general internal medicine was $104,000. This includes all forms of base compensation, including base salary, annualized hourly wage, and base compensation based on productivity. It does not include bonus. Among PAs in general internal medicine, 35% received a bonus, and of PAs who reported receiving one, the median bonus was $6,000.

    For customized information on compensation by state, specialty, work setting, and years of experience, in addition to benefits, please check out the interactive AAPA Salary Report.

Orthopaedic Surgery Overview

According to the 2020 AAPA Salary Report, 11.1% of PAs practice in orthopaedic surgery, making it the second most popular specialty for PAs, behind family medicine. PAs in orthopaedic surgery provide medical care, including procedures such as joint injections and fracture care; assist in surgery; cover call; round on hospital inpatients, and provide musculoskeletal care in emergency departments and urgent care centers.

Orthopaedic surgery is by far the largest surgical specialty for PAs. According to the 2020 AAPA Salary Report, 11.1% of PAs practice in orthopaedic surgery. Whether practicing with highly specialized or general orthopaedic surgeons, PAs provide a range of evaluation and management medical services and procedures, including joint and trigger point injections, wound debridement and closure, tendon repair, and fracture management. Many assist in surgery. In the hospital, PAs conduct rounds, write orders, take calls for inpatient consults and the emergency department, help formulate and implement therapeutic treatment plans, and perform discharge duties.

Compensation

Median compensation in 2019 among PAs in orthopaedic surgery was $112,500. This includes all forms of base compensation, including base salary, annualized hourly wage, and base compensation based on productivity. It does not include bonus. Among PAs in orthopaedic surgery, 58.5% received a bonus, and of PAs who reported receiving one, the median bonus was $8,000.

For customized information on compensation by state, specialty, work setting, and years of experience, in addition to benefits, please check out the interactive AAPA Salary Report.

Urgent Care Overview

According to the 2020 AAPA Salary Report, 6.2% of PAs practice in urgent care. Urgent care medicine is immediate outpatient medical care for acute and chronic illness and injury. The urgent care segment of the healthcare industry has been a growth market since it first appeared in the 1970s. According to Consumer Reports, the number of urgent care facilities increased from 6,400 in 2014 to 8,100 in 2018, with another 500 to 600 expected to open soon. Business analysts expect this delivery setting to continue to grow, as they are seen as a money-saver for patients and health insurers, and as the number of emergency departments declines.

PAs in urgent care need an array of clinical skills and the ability to quicky identify patients who need more intensive emergency care. While urgent care providers may be the first to diagnose a patient with a chronic illness such as asthma or diabetes, those patients usually are referred to a primary care practice for management of the conditions. A survey of 200 urgent care centers found that they all were equipped to diagnose and treat urinary tract infections, respiratory infections, local allergic reactions, abscesses/boils, ear infections, simple lacerations, and suture removal. PAs in urgent care see more patients per week and spend significantly less time consulting with physicians than their counterparts in emergency medicine.

Urgent care most often is delivered in free-standing urgent care centers, although many emergency departments and some primary care offices offer urgent care. PAs are a good fit for urgent care centers with their generalist medical training. For-profit urgent care centers also find PAs attractive because they are less costly to employ than physicians. According to Becker’s Healthcare, the top-reported staffing model for an urgent care center is one physician, one PA, two medical assistants, one radiologic technician, one center manager, and two receptionists.

Some of the benefits of working in urgent care include one-on-one patient opportunities, seeing a wide variety of conditions, lower stress and fewer hours than emergency room counterparts, no on-call duties, and it is a growing segment of the healthcare industry.

Compensation

Median compensation in 2019 among PAs in urgent care medicine was $111,000. This includes all forms of base compensation, including base salary, annualized hourly wage, and base compensation based on productivity. It does not include bonus. Among PAs in urgent care, 52% received a bonus, and of PAs who reported receiving one, the median bonus was $5,000.

For customized information on compensation by state, specialty, work setting, and years of experience, in addition to benefit, please check out the interactive AAPA Salary Report.

Telemedicine Overview

The COVID-19 pandemic has permanently shifted the growth trajectory for telemedicine. In short, telemedicine is here to stay. Now, every PA and PA student must learn to adapt and incorporate these new and expanding clinical skills into their practice. While telemedicine can be a tool in a PA’s clinical toolbelt, it can also be a full-time career path. In recent years, many PAs have been able to add part-time telemedicine roles to supplement their income or shift into full-time dedicated telemedicine positions. This rapidly growing area of clinical practice represents an enormous opportunity for the PA profession and a new way to demonstrate its clinical excellence, flexibility, and capacity to lead in the changing healthcare landscape.

Compensation

According to the 2020 AAPA Salary Report, 9.8% of PAs used telemedicine in their clinics, while 18.8% of PAs in emergency medicine were using telemedicine. PAs in family medicine used telemedicine at 11.8%, while PAs in pediatric subspecialties used it at 11.1%. PAs in internal medicine subspecialties reported using telemedicine at 8.2%, while surgical subspecialties used it at 5.3%. Among other specialties, 10.1% of PAs were using telemedicine in clinical practice. These statistics were gathered before the public health emergency was declared in early 2020.

While PA utilization of telemedicine increased dramatically in 2020 as a result of the pandemic, wide variation in use across specialties and evolving reimbursement models make it challenging to quantify its impact on PA compensation. As telemedicine practice patterns and reimbursement models stabilize, AAPA will continue to study how the use of telemedicine is impacting compensation for PAs who use telemedicine part time as well as those who are exclusively practicing via telemedicine.

Education and CME

Education and CME

2021 Executive Leadership Tuesdays

2021 Executive Leadership Tuesdays is a series of 5 webinars that will provide timely information to help you stay up-to-speed on the ever-changing healthcare environment and improve your healthcare leadership competencies. Experience the interactive webinars from the comfort of your home while engaging with expert faculty.

Evaluation and Management Services in 2021

A new code structure for new and established outpatient E/M services is in effect beginning January 1, 2021. The new structure relies on medical decision-making or time for proper code selection. This activity explores the… more

Degree Pathways

Is your goal to earn an advanced healthcare degree or certificate? This program offers a soft entrance into pursuing an academic degree/certificate by completing pre-requisite coursework specific to PA and NP practice.

Virtual Care Now! Design Thinking for Transformative Care

This activity explores the fundamental concepts and terminology in the practice of virtual medicine, as well as key insights differentiating successful practices and programs from the rest of the field. Plus, this activity serves as… more

Building Your Leadership Skills to Take a Seat at the Table

This course covers various leadership pathways. The goal is to provide learning opportunities in building leadership skills and teams as well as speak to diversity challenges. Leadership models must be flexible but sustainable. This course… more

The AAPA Healthcare Leadership and Management on Demand 2019

With AAPA’s Healthcare Leadership and Management on Demand 2019, earn 6 AAPA Category 1 CME credits as you explore topics like the top three PA leadership strategies, managing successful teams, and more.

Reimbursement & Regulatory Policies for PAs and NPs

PAs and NPs have always been at the forefront of healthcare delivery by increasing patient access to care, improving care coordination and driving quality outcomes. This tutorial will help PAs and NPs better understand their… more

PA/NP Workforce: Trends & Impact

This course will encourage the learner to identify the four main areas where PAs and NPs can have an impact on an organization’s strategy. Those four categories include Patients, Finance, Providers and Risk. The course… more

Evaluating Your PA/NP Workforce: 6 Essential Elements

This course examines the six essential elements to evaluating an organization’s PA/NP workforce. Identifying how the growth of the PA/NP professions is attributable to several national trends as well as unraveling potential artificial barriers to… more

EHRs: Regulations, Opportunities & Risks for Clinicians and Healthcare Leaders

Health information technology and electronic health records (EHRs) are increasingly important to healthcare delivery and practice management. This activity will review the significance and potential benefits of EHRs to patients, clinicians, and healthcare leaders.

Critical Factors of Clinical Leadership for APPs

Using tested leadership models, this course offers vital skills for PAs and NPs to flourish as healthcare leaders, both in direct patient care and leading healthcare teams. The three topics of power/influence, followership, and leading… more

Becoming the Self-Aware Self-Advocate

Contracts, negotiations, promotions or job changes, your professional life isn’t just about patient care. In this course, we will guide you through how to find your voice in salary and position negotiations, navigate the waters… more

Building Leadership Opportunities at Your Institution

This session aims to address the answers to four primary questions you should ask when thinking about building leadership opportunities at your institution. Why build them? How are they defined? What is the building process?… more

Incorporating PAs and NPs into Organizational Strategy for Maximum Impact

This webinar outlines how best to incorporate PAs and NPs into your organizational strategy.

Leadership on Demand

Access recorded leadership sessions from AAPA’s live events and webinars. Choose sessions and bundles from the popular Executive Leadership Conference, AAPA Conference, and more.

Conference on Demand 2020: Emergency Medicine CME

Conference on Demand 2020: Emergency Medicine CME has 35.25 AAPA Category 1 CME credits of clinical CME from a case-based review of recent impactful literature on emergency medicine designed to empower clinicians to make evidence-based… more

Conference on Demand 2020: Cardiovascular CME

Conference on Demand 2020: Cardiovascular CME has 15.5 AAPA Category 1 CME credits of clinical CME from a high-yield, evidence-based review of key elements in the management of atrial fibrillation to a case-based update in… more

Conference on Demand 2020: Full Library

Conference on Demand 2020: Full Library offers 150+ AAPA Category 1 CME credits from a high-level view of the impact of COVID-19 on healthcare systems, to diabetes and obesity care to legal considerations of telemedicine,… more

The Truth about PAs and Advocacy Series

Legislators want to hear from PAs, advocacy is something all PAs can, and should, do. This two-part CME series is designed to educate, encourage, and inspire PAs to become advocates on behalf of the profession.

The Role of Social Determinants of Health in Clinical Practice and Subsequent Health Outcomes

Learn about the effects of the social determinants of health (SDOH) on population health, how they inform your patient encounters and medical decision making, and the connection between SDOH and health outcomes.

2021 Executive Leadership Tuesdays Webinar Series

Check out AAPA’s interactive healthcare leadership webinar series for current or aspiring clinical or administrative leaders. Registration includes access to the live webinar series plus all 5 webinar recordings!

PA Title Change Investigation: Final Reports from AAPA and WPP/Landor

In this not-to-be-missed session, independent agency WPP/Landor* and AAPA provide their reports in response to the 2018 AAPA House of Delegates Resolution requesting a PA Title Change Investigation. Learn about WPP/Landor’s research with various stakeholder… more

Bias: What You Don’t Know Can Hurt You and Your Patients

Learn about issues related to equity in healthcare, understand the concept of implicit bias, and examine how your own biases can impact the care your patients receive.

PAs and the Greatest Health Crisis in our Lifetimes

This activity explores the current challenges facing the PA profession during the COVID-19 pandemic, and beyond. To meet the needs of patients in these unprecedented times, PA’s are called to be innovative and proactive in… more

Evaluation and Management Services in 2021

A new code structure for new and established outpatient E/M services is in effect beginning January 1, 2021. The new structure relies on medical decision-making or time for proper code selection. This activity explores the… more

Research in Action 2020

Learn from PA Researchers as they cover topics that will help clinicians and educators advance the PA profession. These sessions include topics related to PA employment such as a look at the amount of on-the-job… more

Title Change Investigation (TCI) Update

In this not-to-be-missed session, join representatives from WPP, the agency conducting the Title Change Investigation (TCI), as they provide an update on research that will guide and inform the best marketing strategy and title for… more

The Advocate’s Toolbox: Achieving Advocacy Success at the State and Federal Levels

Clinicians tend to avoid taking action on policy issues — it’s a dirty, nasty business that has very little to do with achieving results — or is it? If you struggle with knowing the difference… more

Reimbursement & Regulatory Policies for PAs and NPs

PAs and NPs have always been at the forefront of healthcare delivery by increasing patient access to care, improving care coordination and driving quality outcomes. This tutorial will help PAs and NPs better understand their… more

AAPA Primary Care RAP Podcast

The lively pulse of Primary Care (with a PA spin) in an entertaining, monthly podcast.

We Are Family (Medicine) on Demand 2021

Family Medicine on Demand 2021 includes recorded sessions from the 2021 We Are Family (Medicine) virtual conference. This video-based CME activity offers up to 36.0 AAPA Category 1 CME credits from ocular pathology, to infectious… more

Telemedicine CME Series

These activities explore the fundamental concepts and terminology in the practice of virtual medicine, provide a comprehensive overview of the CMS telehealth guideline updates, highlight a detailed outline of the documentation and coding requirements for… more

PAIN COACH—Pain Assessments and INterventions to Consider in Older Adult Care for Healthcare Providers

By listening to these podcasts, you can learn how to reduce serious adverse outcomes resulting from inappropriate prescribing, misuse, and abuse of opioid analgesics, while managing chronic pain in older adults.

Satellite Symposium 2020: Focus on Flu with an Eye on Treatment

Although the impact of influenza varies, it places a substantial burden on the health of people in the United States each year. PAs, NPs, primary care physicians, and other healthcare professionals can identify and help… more

Smiles for Life: A National Oral Health Curriculum

Smiles for Life is the nation’s only comprehensive oral health curriculum. It is designed to enhance the role of primary care clinicians in the promotion of oral health for all age groups through interactive online… more

Primary Care Obesity Management Certificate Program

AAPA has collaborated with the world’s leading organization on obesity management, The Obesity Society, and an award-winning educational partner, Integrated Learning Partners, to develop the 2020-2021 Obesity Management in Primary Care Certificate Program designed for PAs and NPs.

Current and Future State of Cardiovascular Disease and Type 2 Diabetes Series

These three educational programs follow the progression of cardiovascular disease from early/pre-diabetes to advancing/progressive disease to late stage/managing advanced complications. The primary audiences for these programs are PAs, physicians and nurses.

Boot Camp on Demand 2020

When it comes to adult hospital medicine CME, anytime and anywhere Boot Camp on Demand is for you! Boot Camp on Demand 2020 includes newly recorded content that was originally planned for the in-person 2020… more

Conference on Demand 2020: Full Library

Conference on Demand 2020: Full Library offers 150+ AAPA Category 1 CME credits from a high-level view of the impact of COVID-19 on healthcare systems, to diabetes and obesity care to legal considerations of telemedicine,… more

Rapid Response: The Approach to the Acutely Ill Patient

PAs are faced with acutely ill patients on a regular basis whether working in the ED, inpatient, or outpatient settings. The ability to evaluate and make immediate management decisions is crucial. This session develops a… more

Empathetics Bundle

Gain knowledge on how to improve the patient and clinician experience and earn up 4 AAPA Category 1 CME credits. Empathetics self-paced online courses are based on extensive and novel clinical research conducted at Massachusetts… more

Serious Illness Management Toolkit Bundle

Expand your primary palliative care skills and earn up to 5 AAPA Category 1 CME credits and 1.25 AAPA Category 1 Self-Assessment CME credits. Specially designed for PAs interested in palliative care for patients with… more

We Are Family (Medicine) on Demand 2021

Family Medicine on Demand 2021 includes recorded sessions from the 2021 We Are Family (Medicine) virtual conference. This video-based CME activity offers up to 36.0 AAPA Category 1 CME credits from ocular pathology, to infectious… more

Clinical Dialogue: Optimizing Vaccination in Immunosuppressed Patients with Autoimmune and Inflammatory Disease

Patients with autoimmune or inflammatory disease, such as rheumatologic diseases, multiple sclerosis, and inflammatory bowel disease, are at increased risk for serious infection. Potent immunosuppressive therapy, which largely comprises biologic agents, has become the mainstay… more

Conference on Demand 2020: Infectious Disease/HIV CME

Conference on Demand 2020: Infectious Disease/HIV has 15 AAPA Category 1 CME credits of clinical CME from the ethical implications of vaccine hesitancy to the current status of HIV, and more all on demand.

Conference on Demand 2020: Endocrinology, Gastroenterology, Nutrition CME

Conference on Demand 2020: Endocrinology, Gastroenterology, Nutrition CME has 24.75 AAPA Category 1 CME credits of clinical CME from the latest in diabetes, obesity, and inflammatory bowel disease, to a call to action to raise… more

eCase Challenge: Back in Business: Strategies for the Diagnosis and Management of Patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis

Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic inflammatory disease that primarily affects the axial skeleton and to a lesser extent the peripheral skeleton. It is characterized by lower back pain from chronic inflammation that may progress… more

Clinical Dialogue: Back in Business: Strategies for the Diagnosis and Management of Patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis

Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic inflammatory disease that primarily affects the axial skeleton and to a lesser extent the peripheral skeleton. It is characterized by lower back pain from chronic inflammation that may progress… more

Current and Future State of Cardiovascular Disease and Type 2 Diabetes Series

These three educational programs follow the progression of cardiovascular disease from early/pre-diabetes to advancing/progressive disease to late stage/managing advanced complications. The primary audiences for these programs are PAs, physicians and nurses.

Monograph: Managing Depression After Initial Treatment: A Review of Next Steps in Major Depressive Disorder

Major depressive disorder (MDD) remains a top cause of disability worldwide and in the United States. In the U.S., roughly one in six people will have at least one episode of MDD over their lives…. more

eCase Challenge: Managing Depression After Initial Treatment: A Review of Next Steps in Major Depressive Disorder

Major depressive disorder (MDD) remains a top cause of disability worldwide and in the United States. In the U.S., roughly one in six people will have at least one episode of MDD over their lives…. more

Clinical Dialogue: Managing Depression After Initial Treatment: A Review of Next Steps in Major Depressive Disorder

Major depressive disorder (MDD) remains a top cause of disability worldwide and in the United States. In the U.S., roughly one in six people will have at least one episode of MDD over their lives…. more

Getting to Yes: Practical Strategies for Navigating Immunization Decisions With Older Adults Series

These courses provide a high-level review on current vaccination recommendations for adults 50 year and older. These courses focus on strategies that will help address common barriers patients may have about recommended vaccinations, outline key… more

Rheumatic Learning: What are the Basics of Inflammation and MOA – Brief Animated Video Series

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) are related disorders with distinct features. While there are underlying similarities between the 2 disorders, the immune processes and pathways differ slightly, which is important with regard to… more

Monograph: Individualized Management of Patients with T2DM and Comorbidities While Reducing Hypoglycemia Risk

Hypoglycemia remains the rate-limiting factor in the achievement of glycemic goals in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) treated with pharmacotherapy. Unfortunately, hypoglycemia is common among patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes… more

eCase Challenge #2: Individualized Management of Patients with T2DM and Comorbidities While Reducing Hypoglycemia Risk

Hypoglycemia remains the rate-limiting factor in the achievement of glycemic goals in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) treated with pharmacotherapy. Unfortunately, hypoglycemia is common among patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes… more

eCase Challenge #1: Individualized Management of Patients with T2DM and Comorbidities While Reducing Hypoglycemia Risk

Hypoglycemia remains the rate-limiting factor in the achievement of glycemic goals in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) treated with pharmacotherapy. Unfortunately, hypoglycemia is common among patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes… more

Rheumatic Learning Series

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) are related disorders with distinct features. While there are underlying similarities between the 2 disorders, the immune processes and pathways differ slightly, which is important with regard to… more

PAIN COACH—Pain Assessments and INterventions to Consider in Older Adult Care for Healthcare Providers

By listening to these podcasts, you can learn how to reduce serious adverse outcomes resulting from inappropriate prescribing, misuse, and abuse of opioid analgesics, while managing chronic pain in older adults.

Latest Trends in Contraception: How to Meet the Demands for Long-acting Reversible Contraception

In this interactive module, learners are provided with the latest information and techniques regarding the safe and effective use of Long-acting Reversible Contraceptives (LARCS). Including real-world practice scenarios and recorded insights from expert faculty, this… more

eCase Challenge: Strategies to Address Opioid-Induced Constipation

The use of opioids for the treatment of chronic pain has increased substantially during the past decade. Despite their therapeutic benefits, however, opioids are also associated with important adverse effects, such as physical dependence, sedation,… more

Satellite Symposium 2020: Diagnosing and Managing Primary Headache Disorders in the Primary Care Setting: Challenges and Opportunities

This case-based activity covers the treatment and management of patients with headache disorders, including migraine, and cluster headaches.

Watch How PAs Discuss Management of Nutritional Health

A series of three animated explainer videos that focuses on the role a PA plays in nutrition, nutritional counseling, and treatment. This activity is part of AAPA’s National Health Priorities Nutrition Toolkit.

Nutritional Counseling and Developing a Nutrition Plan

This interactive module focuses on how important nutrition is in special populations, review of nutritional supplements, and different approaches to nutritional counseling. This activity is part of AAPA’s National Health Priorities Nutrition Toolkit.

Assessment of Nutritional Status

This interactive module focuses on the important role PA’s play in managing a patient’s nutritional health in routine patient visits. This activity is part of AAPA’s National Health Priorities Nutrition Toolkit.

Satellite Symposium 2020: Focus on Flu with an Eye on Treatment

Although the impact of influenza varies, it places a substantial burden on the health of people in the United States each year. PAs, NPs, primary care physicians, and other healthcare professionals can identify and help… more

Reproductive Health Care: Conversations for Clinicians and Their Patients

The average American woman becomes sexually active at age 17 and wants two children. She will spend approximately 4 years of her sexually active reproductive life either pregnant or trying to get pregnant, and 25+… more

Building Pathways in Pain Management: Advancing the Future of Chronic Pain Management

Chronic pain is an under-recognized and under-resourced public health problem with devastating impact. In the United States, chronic pain represents more years lost to disability than cancer, heart attacks, and diabetes combined. Chronic low back… more

A Call to Action: Raising Awareness About Nutritional Health

This activity provides a convenient and unique opportunity for clinicians to participate in medical education which focuses on the need for the PA profession to address the critical public health topic of nutrition.

Empathetics Bundle

Gain knowledge on how to improve the patient and clinician experience and earn up 4 AAPA Category 1 CME credits. Empathetics self-paced online courses are based on extensive and novel clinical research conducted at Massachusetts… more

2021 Musculoskeletal Galaxy: Virtual

The Musculoskeletal Galaxy is going virtual in 2021! Learn critical orthopaedic topics from expert faculty at this popular conference! This course is designed to offer PAs and NPs a well-rounded foundation on the essential orthopaedic topics. It’s the perfect course if you are new to orthopaedics, or if you are a family practice, emergency medicine, or urgent care provider who sees musculoskeletal conditions in your daily practice.

Building Pathways in Pain Management: Advancing the Future of Chronic Pain Management

Chronic pain is an under-recognized and under-resourced public health problem with devastating impact. In the United States, chronic pain represents more years lost to disability than cancer, heart attacks, and diabetes combined. Chronic low back… more

PAOS On Demand

Physician Assistants in Orthopaedic Surgery (PAOS) on Demand includes topics on shoulders, hips, knees, spine, osteoporosis, MRI, surgical techniques and more, all on demand. This is the perfect course for advanced knowledge on the diagnosis and management of many musculoskeletal conditions.

Galaxy on Demand

Galaxy on Demand offers up to 21.5 AAPA Category 1 CME credits, from musculoskeletal infections to orthopaedic rehabilitation techniques and more, all on demand. This is the perfect course if you are new to orthopaedics or want to transition into it.

AAPA Emergency Medicine Self-Assessment

Get quick feedback on your Emergency Medicine knowledge with test questions – organized by organ system and task dimension and accessible from any device or computer. Reinforce your know-how with a detailed assessment report and extensive resource of correct answers and explanations.

Clinical Dialogue: Current Evidence and Controversies in COVID-19: Discussion on Best Practices Amid Changing Evidence

With the current COVID-19 pandemic, clinicians are placed in a difficult position of staying abreast of the ever-changing landscape of complexities that this virus presents. To support PAs’ understanding of COVID-19, this activity provides an… more

Rapid Response: The Approach to the Acutely Ill Patient

PAs are faced with acutely ill patients on a regular basis whether working in the ED, inpatient, or outpatient settings. The ability to evaluate and make immediate management decisions is crucial. This session develops a… more

Empathetics Bundle

Gain knowledge on how to improve the patient and clinician experience and earn up 4 AAPA Category 1 CME credits. Empathetics self-paced online courses are based on extensive and novel clinical research conducted at Massachusetts… more

Emerging Drugs of Misuse and their Public Health Implications

This activity covers some emerging drugs of misuse and their public health implications. Substance use, misuse, and abuse has become a leading public health topic in the U.S. The American Public Health Association estimates that… more

Telemedicine: Legal Considerations

PAs and other healthcare providers working in telemedicine may not be aware of some of the potential legal pitfalls regarding this type of patient care. This session addresses how you can comply with legal and… more

Rapid Launch to Virtual Visits: Telemedicine During Covid-19 and Beyond

The Rapid Launch to Virtual Visits activity will provide participants with a comprehensive overview of the CMS telehealth guideline updates in response to the PHE. A detailed outline of the documentation and coding requirements for… more

Virtual Care Now! Design Thinking for Transformative Care

This activity explores the fundamental concepts and terminology in the practice of virtual medicine, as well as key insights differentiating successful practices and programs from the rest of the field. Plus, this activity serves as… more

Vital Minds Podcast Episode 20 – Telemedicine, Treating Pain, and the Prescription Decision

Vital Minds is a podcast of the PA Foundation, a national nonprofit organization that promotes better health and wellness by providing PAs and PA students with philanthropic opportunities and resources.

We Are Family (Medicine) on Demand 2021

Family Medicine on Demand 2021 includes recorded sessions from the 2021 We Are Family (Medicine) virtual conference. This video-based CME activity offers up to 36.0 AAPA Category 1 CME credits from ocular pathology, to infectious… more

Conference on Demand 2020: Pediatrics CME

Conference on Demand 2020: Pediatrics CME has 17 AAPA Category 1 CME credits of clinical CME from identifying barriers to care for uninsured children with complex medical conditions to pearls and pitfalls of treating the… more

Conference on Demand 2020: Infectious Disease/HIV CME

Conference on Demand 2020: Infectious Disease/HIV has 15 AAPA Category 1 CME credits of clinical CME from the ethical implications of vaccine hesitancy to the current status of HIV, and more all on demand.

Conference on Demand 2020: Emergency Medicine CME

Conference on Demand 2020: Emergency Medicine CME has 35.25 AAPA Category 1 CME credits of clinical CME from a case-based review of recent impactful literature on emergency medicine designed to empower clinicians to make evidence-based… more

Conference on Demand 2020: Cardiovascular CME

Conference on Demand 2020: Cardiovascular CME has 15.5 AAPA Category 1 CME credits of clinical CME from a high-yield, evidence-based review of key elements in the management of atrial fibrillation to a case-based update in… more

Current and Future State of Cardiovascular Disease and Type 2 Diabetes Series

These three educational programs follow the progression of cardiovascular disease from early/pre-diabetes to advancing/progressive disease to late stage/managing advanced complications. The primary audiences for these programs are PAs, physicians and nurses.

Monograph: Managing Depression After Initial Treatment: A Review of Next Steps in Major Depressive Disorder

Major depressive disorder (MDD) remains a top cause of disability worldwide and in the United States. In the U.S., roughly one in six people will have at least one episode of MDD over their lives…. more

eCase Challenge: Managing Depression After Initial Treatment: A Review of Next Steps in Major Depressive Disorder

Major depressive disorder (MDD) remains a top cause of disability worldwide and in the United States. In the U.S., roughly one in six people will have at least one episode of MDD over their lives…. more

Clinical Dialogue: Managing Depression After Initial Treatment: A Review of Next Steps in Major Depressive Disorder

Major depressive disorder (MDD) remains a top cause of disability worldwide and in the United States. In the U.S., roughly one in six people will have at least one episode of MDD over their lives…. more

Getting to Yes: Practical Strategies for Navigating Immunization Decisions With Older Adults Series

These courses provide a high-level review on current vaccination recommendations for adults 50 year and older. These courses focus on strategies that will help address common barriers patients may have about recommended vaccinations, outline key… more

Monograph: Individualized Management of Patients with T2DM and Comorbidities While Reducing Hypoglycemia Risk

Hypoglycemia remains the rate-limiting factor in the achievement of glycemic goals in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) treated with pharmacotherapy. Unfortunately, hypoglycemia is common among patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes… more

eCase Challenge #2: Individualized Management of Patients with T2DM and Comorbidities While Reducing Hypoglycemia Risk

Hypoglycemia remains the rate-limiting factor in the achievement of glycemic goals in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) treated with pharmacotherapy. Unfortunately, hypoglycemia is common among patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes… more

eCase Challenge #1: Individualized Management of Patients with T2DM and Comorbidities While Reducing Hypoglycemia Risk

Hypoglycemia remains the rate-limiting factor in the achievement of glycemic goals in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) treated with pharmacotherapy. Unfortunately, hypoglycemia is common among patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes… more

Evaluation and Management Services in 2021

A new code structure for new and established outpatient E/M services is in effect beginning January 1, 2021. The new structure relies on medical decision-making or time for proper code selection. This activity explores the… more

PAIN COACH—Pain Assessments and INterventions to Consider in Older Adult Care for Healthcare Providers

By listening to these podcasts, you can learn how to reduce serious adverse outcomes resulting from inappropriate prescribing, misuse, and abuse of opioid analgesics, while managing chronic pain in older adults.

First Aid for Seizures – Stay, Safe, Side

While everyone should know basic seizure first aid, becoming Seizure First Aid Certified takes you further. You will learn how to recognize signs of a seizure and how to use the basic first aid steps… more

eCase Challenge: Strategies to Address Opioid-Induced Constipation

The use of opioids for the treatment of chronic pain has increased substantially during the past decade. Despite their therapeutic benefits, however, opioids are also associated with important adverse effects, such as physical dependence, sedation,… more

Satellite Symposium 2020: Diagnosing and Managing Primary Headache Disorders in the Primary Care Setting: Challenges and Opportunities

This case-based activity covers the treatment and management of patients with headache disorders, including migraine, and cluster headaches.

Galaxy on Demand 2020

Galaxy on Demand 2020 includes new sessions recorded in 2020, plus some recorded sessions from the 2019 Galaxy conference. From musculoskeletal infections to orthopaedic rehabilitation techniques and more, all on demand. Ideal for those new… more

Satellite Symposium 2020: Focus on Flu with an Eye on Treatment

Although the impact of influenza varies, it places a substantial burden on the health of people in the United States each year. PAs, NPs, primary care physicians, and other healthcare professionals can identify and help… more

Building Pathways in Pain Management: Advancing the Future of Chronic Pain Management

Chronic pain is an under-recognized and under-resourced public health problem with devastating impact. In the United States, chronic pain represents more years lost to disability than cancer, heart attacks, and diabetes combined. Chronic low back… more

Conference on Demand 2020: Full Library

Conference on Demand 2020: Full Library offers 150+ AAPA Category 1 CME credits from a high-level view of the impact of COVID-19 on healthcare systems, to diabetes and obesity care to legal considerations of telemedicine,… more

Rapid Response: The Approach to the Acutely Ill Patient

PAs are faced with acutely ill patients on a regular basis whether working in the ED, inpatient, or outpatient settings. The ability to evaluate and make immediate management decisions is crucial. This session develops a… more

Empathetics Bundle

Gain knowledge on how to improve the patient and clinician experience and earn up 4 AAPA Category 1 CME credits. Empathetics self-paced online courses are based on extensive and novel clinical research conducted at Massachusetts… more

Emerging Drugs of Misuse and their Public Health Implications

This activity covers some emerging drugs of misuse and their public health implications. Substance use, misuse, and abuse has become a leading public health topic in the U.S. The American Public Health Association estimates that… more

Resources

Resources

Salary Report 2021

Get the pay and benefits you deserve with the 2021 AAPA Salary Report. Free to AAPA fellow, student and retired members.

Productivity Articles

Learn about PA productivity and value, and explore ways to measure PA contribution.

Reimbursement

Read the latest news and resources on reimbursement, compiled by the AAPA advocacy team.

Business Ownership and Independent Contracting

Decide whether ownership or working for yourself is right for you.

Essential Nutrition Concepts

If you’d like to offer more in-depth nutritional counseling to your patients, start with this free, AAPA-approved curriculum developed in partnership with The France Foundation and supported by Abbott Nutrition. Learn evidence-based guidance from PAs with nutrition expertise on topics like assessing a patient’s nutritional status, offering nutritional counseling, and developing a nutrition plan.

Obesity Leadership Edge

Overweight and obesity compose a chronic disease of epidemic proportions that presents on a continuum, likely affecting nearly two out of every three patients treated by PAs. The effective treatment of overweight and obesity requires an efficient and timely process of screening, diagnosis, evaluation of complications, staging, and clear algorithmic management.

Diabetes Leadership Edge

According to the CDC, more than 34 million Americans have diabetes and another 88 million have pre-diabetes. The progressive nature of diabetes and its relationship to other serious conditions like cardiovascular disease and kidney disease make it a priority for PAs and other providers. AAPA’s Diabetes Leadership Edge curriculum will help you stay up to date on diabetes care.

Essential Nutrition Concepts

If you’d like to offer more in-depth nutritional counseling to your patients, start with this free, AAPA-approved curriculum developed in partnership with The France Foundation and supported by Abbott Nutrition. Learn evidence-based guidance from PAs with nutrition expertise on topics like assessing a patient’s nutritional status, offering nutritional counseling, and developing a nutrition plan.

Obesity Leadership Edge

Overweight and obesity compose a chronic disease of epidemic proportions that presents on a continuum, likely affecting nearly two out of every three patients treated by PAs. The effective treatment of overweight and obesity requires an efficient and timely process of screening, diagnosis, evaluation of complications, staging, and clear algorithmic management.

Diabetes Leadership Edge

According to the CDC, more than 34 million Americans have diabetes and another 88 million have pre-diabetes. The progressive nature of diabetes and its relationship to other serious conditions like cardiovascular disease and kidney disease make it a priority for PAs and other providers. AAPA’s Diabetes Leadership Edge curriculum will help you stay up to date on diabetes care.

Clinical Preceptor Recognition Program

AAPA recognizes the hard work of preceptors through its Clinical Preceptor Recognition Program, developed in cooperation with the PA Education Association (PAEA).

Commission on Continuing Professional Development and Education

The Commission on Continuing Professional Development and Education was created to assist AAPA on educational content planning, health systems leadership development, conflict of interest policies related to CME, certification changes, and member engagement.

PA Program Portal

AAPA provides educators with trusted classroom resources on the PA profession, advocacy, clinical topics, and career development.

PAs and Team Practice

A summary of PAs in team-oriented care models.

PAs and Practice Ownership

A summary of opportunities and challenges for PAs interested in practice ownership.

PA Prescribing

An AAPA Issue Brief describing all aspects of prescribing by PAs, including prescribing controlled medications.

Chart Cosignature: What Is Best for Patient Care?

Issue brief regarding how chart cosignature is being re-evaluated now.

PA Education

Issue brief on PA educational programs.

PA Prescribing

An AAPA Issue Brief describing all aspects of prescribing by PAs, including prescribing controlled medications.

Evaluating and Certifying Health Status

Issue brief on PAs and their ability to certify the health status of individuals.

PAs and Buprenorphine in Opioid Treatment Programs

A summary of rules regarding buprenorphine in opioid treatment as they relate to PAs.

Chart Cosignature: What Is Best for Patient Care?

Issue brief regarding how chart cosignature is being re-evaluated now.

PA Training and Skills to Work with Survivors of Sexual Violence

Sexual violence affects every demographic and every community, making this a serious public health concern. PAs can improve their ability to treat all survivors of sexual violence through continuing education and in adjusting practice habits to ask patients at every visit about their sexual health and safety.

Insights into the Primary Care PA Experience During COVID-19: 6 Months In

The results from the August 2020 PA Practice Survey illustrate the status of primary care PAs six months into the COVID-19 pandemic.

PA Prescribing

An AAPA Issue Brief describing all aspects of prescribing by PAs, including prescribing controlled medications.

PAs in Hospice and Palliative Care

Overview of the role of PAs in hospice and palliative medicine.

PAs and Buprenorphine in Opioid Treatment Programs

A summary of rules regarding buprenorphine in opioid treatment as they relate to PAs.

Chart Cosignature: What Is Best for Patient Care?

Issue brief regarding how chart cosignature is being re-evaluated now.

PA Training and Skills to Work with Survivors of Sexual Violence

Sexual violence affects every demographic and every community, making this a serious public health concern. PAs can improve their ability to treat all survivors of sexual violence through continuing education and in adjusting practice habits to ask patients at every visit about their sexual health and safety.

PA Prescribing

An AAPA Issue Brief describing all aspects of prescribing by PAs, including prescribing controlled medications.

Evaluating and Certifying Health Status

Issue brief on PAs and their ability to certify the health status of individuals.

PAs and Buprenorphine in Opioid Treatment Programs

A summary of rules regarding buprenorphine in opioid treatment as they relate to PAs.

Chart Cosignature: What Is Best for Patient Care?

Issue brief regarding how chart cosignature is being re-evaluated now.

PA Training and Skills to Work with Survivors of Sexual Violence

Sexual violence affects every demographic and every community, making this a serious public health concern. PAs can improve their ability to treat all survivors of sexual violence through continuing education and in adjusting practice habits to ask patients at every visit about their sexual health and safety.

Insights into the Primary Care PA Experience During COVID-19: 6 Months In

The results from the August 2020 PA Practice Survey illustrate the status of primary care PAs six months into the COVID-19 pandemic.

PA Prescribing

An AAPA Issue Brief describing all aspects of prescribing by PAs, including prescribing controlled medications.

PAs in Orthopaedic Surgery

AAPA Issue Brief on PAs in Orthopaedic Surgery.

PAs and OPAs: The Distinctions

Issue brief on physician assistants (PAs) in orthopaedics and “orthopaedic physician’s assistants” (OPAs).

Chart Cosignature: What Is Best for Patient Care?

Issue brief regarding how chart cosignature is being re-evaluated now.

PAs in Emergency Medicine

Issue brief on PAs in Emergency Medicine.

EMTALA and PAs

A summary of PA roles and responsibilities related to the Emergency Medical Treatment and Labor Act, including medical screening exams, certifying false labor, emergency department call, and transferring patients.

PA Prescribing

An AAPA Issue Brief describing all aspects of prescribing by PAs, including prescribing controlled medications.

Evaluating and Certifying Health Status

Issue brief on PAs and their ability to certify the health status of individuals.

PAs and Buprenorphine in Opioid Treatment Programs

A summary of rules regarding buprenorphine in opioid treatment as they relate to PAs.

Chart Cosignature: What Is Best for Patient Care?

Issue brief regarding how chart cosignature is being re-evaluated now.

PA Training and Skills to Work with Survivors of Sexual Violence

Sexual violence affects every demographic and every community, making this a serious public health concern. PAs can improve their ability to treat all survivors of sexual violence through continuing education and in adjusting practice habits to ask patients at every visit about their sexual health and safety.

PA Use of Telemedicine in June 2020: Trends and Implications for PAs

This data brief from AAPA provides a status update on telemedicine usage during the COVID-19 pandemic and outlines trends and barriers to use.

Telemedicine Special Registration Process Sign-On Letter to DEA

A letter to the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) signed by AAPA and its partners requesting a telemedicine special registration process to enable providers to safely prescribe controlled substances remotely.

Telehealth & Telemedicine by PAs During the COVID-19 Pandemic

PAs, if authorized by State law, institutional policy, and scope of practice, may provide and be reimbursed for nearly all telehealth and telemedicine under Medicare and most Medicaid and commercial payers.

PA Prescribing

An AAPA Issue Brief describing all aspects of prescribing by PAs, including prescribing controlled medications.

Evaluating and Certifying Health Status

Issue brief on PAs and their ability to certify the health status of individuals.

Chart Cosignature: What Is Best for Patient Care?

Issue brief regarding how chart cosignature is being re-evaluated now.

Articles

Articles

Katherine Wilkens, Kasey Drapeau D’Amato, and Stephen D’Amato posing outside

PA Entrepreneur Develops Popular Skincare Line

Kasey Drapeau D’Amato, a PA in dermatology, used her clinical skills to build a skincare business. Read how D’Amato became an entrepreneur and started Airelle Skincare. She also shares her skincare secrets and advice for PAs who want to start a business.

Top 10 Skincare Secrets from Dermatology PAs

PAs who practice in dermatology are able to literally see conditions on the skin and the results of any treatments they prescribe — a reward that may be the biggest benefit of working in this specialty. Here are their top 10 tips to achieve healthy skin.

PA Uses Business Acumen to Improve Patient Care 

Vice President of Operations Julie Gessin, PA-C, at New York-based Schweiger Dermatology Group, with 47 offices in New York and New Jersey and 600 employees, focuses on business operations to help improve patient care.

JAAPA Articles on Dermatology

Read articles on dermatology in JAAPA, the peer-reviewed clinical journal of AAPA, published for more than 25 years.

Kris Pyles-Sweet, MS, PA-C; Travis Randolph, PA-C; Emily WhiteHorse, Ph.D., PA-C; Melissa Ricker, PA-C

Insider Tips on Popular PA Specialties

PAs know that career flexibility is a built-in benefit of the profession. But it can be overwhelming to think about transitioning specialties. Do you have enough experience? What’s the best way to get your foot in the door? Four experts share their insights.

Kristopher R. Maday headshot

What Makes a Good PA Professor? These 7 Ps

Kristopher R. Maday, MS, PA-C, DFAAPA, is a committed and passionate PA educator. He shares what his own favorite professors have in common, and how he strives to make PA school educational and fun for his own students.

Nicole S. Cournoyer reviewing a chart

A Day in the Life of PA Faculty and Clinician

Nicole S. Cournoyer, PA-C, faculty member at Thomas Jefferson University, started her career in a community-based oncology office. Teaching patients and family members about disease processes, medications and interventions led to lecturing then teaching full-time at her alma mater.

Kurtis A. Manley

2020 Preceptor of the Year Aims to ‘Learn Something and Help Someone’ Every Day

Kurtis A. Manley, PA-C, DFAAPA, is the 2020 AAPA/PAEA Preceptor of the Year. Manley is a Navy veteran and a primary care PA in Kingman, Arizona, and has precepted more than 100 PA students over the last 18 years.

AAPA HOD Responds to Preceptor Shortage with Increased CME

Preceptors may now earn 2 AAPA Category 1 CME credits per week for each PA student they precept, and preceptors may earn a maximum of 20 AAPA Category 1 CME credits during any single calendar year.

Andy Le and Linda Som next to the Arizona Medical Clinic mission

Husband and Wife MDs Awarded the 2019 Preceptor of the Year Award

B. Andy Le, MD and Linda Som, MD, serve underserved refugee populations in Phoenix, Arizona, and have precepted PA students for 10 years – providing them an opportunity to care for a diverse population, and earning them this year’s Preceptor of the Year Award.

JAAPA Articles on Healthcare Education

Read articles on healthcare education in JAAPA, the peer-reviewed clinical journal of AAPA, published for more than 25 years.

Q&A with PA Leader Clair Kuriakose

Clair Kuriakose, MBA, PA-C, is a high achiever. She sets goals for herself, achieves them, and then strategically lays out her next steps. She finished PA school, got her MBA and Lean Six Sigma certification, and now leads advanced practice providers at Stanford Health Care.

Two PAs talking

Quantifying PA Productivity Can be Challenging

Measuring productivity in healthcare is important to determine contribution to care, revenue generation, and job performance; however, accurate measurement of a health professional’s productivity can be challenging. PAs are acutely affected when productivity measurements are quantified by financial contribution alone.

The winners of the CHLM Employer of Excellence award

Learn About Best APP Models From These Employers

How do you recruit and retain the best PA talent at your workplace? Among those with excellent hiring potential are PA employers that have advanced practice provider (APP) structures formed to offer management and leadership opportunities for PAs and NPs.

Josanne Pagel headshot

Long-Time PA Leader Josanne Pagel Shares Motivations and Career Journey

Josanne Pagel, MPAS, PA-C, DFAAPA, AAPA past president, recently shared her thoughts about her career journey with AAPA’s Andrea Lowe, MHA, PA-C. Pagel reflects on everything from her days in the Peace Corps to her current role at the Cleveland Clinic.

PA pointing at a computer in front of another PA

3 Ways PAs Can Advance Their Careers Through Leadership

For PAs looking to grow in their careers, there are also many opportunities to become a true leader in your field — either directly or through thought leadership. Here are three ways to advance in your career and become a leader.

PAs, sitting at a table, having a discussion

Experts Discuss Impacts of PA/NP Onboarding on Organizational Finances

The American College of Healthcare Executives recently hosted a webinar – How PA/NP Onboarding Impacts Organizational Finances – to share best recruitment, onboarding, retention, and financial practices with participants. Here is a recap of key takeaways.

Three PAs walking down a hallway

Help Your Employer Recognize the Power of the PA Workforce

Not all PAs are lucky enough to work at an organization that fully recognizes all the ways in which PAs contribute to the healthcare continuum. You can help your employer recognize the power of the PA workforce and fully utilize advanced practice providers (APPs), including PAs, across their organizations.

CHLM/ACHE Leadership Institute image

Grow Your Hospital Career with FACHE Credential

For PAs interested in transitioning from clinical leader to executive within a hospital or healthcare organization, consider the American College of Healthcare Executives (ACHE) and Center for Healthcare Leadership and Management (CHLM) Leadership Institute.

The winners of the CHLM Employer of Excellence award

How to Build an APP Leadership Career Pathway in Your Organization

What do Employers of Excellence have in common? Pathways for APPs to excel, including formal leadership training, a structured career pathway, and APP councils. These help to create positive environments that seek input and opportunities for improvement.

PAs walking and talking

Survey Uncovers Ways Employers Can Enhance the PA Workplace

CHLM’s 2018 PA and NP Workplace Experiences National Summary Report offers insight to help employers enhance the working environment for PAs and NPs, focusing on recruitment and retention, onboarding, clinical utilization, leadership structure, billing and reimbursement, and productivity reporting.

PA sitting at her desk, smiling

Looking for a Non-Clinical Role? Consider Medical or Clinical Science Liaison

PAs who serve as medical and clinical science liaisons play a unique role in pharmaceutical and other medical organizations. They use their clinical skills to interpret clinical trials, medications’ chemical composition, safety matters, and help to educate clinicians.

Two PAs talking

Bianca Belcher: 4 Things to Know About Becoming a Leader

Executive Director of Clinical Integration, Bianca Belcher, MPH, PA-C, talks about how she has transitioned from clinician to a senior leadership role. Her advice to future leaders: Get involved, communicate effectively, work hard, see the big picture, and network.

DeTroye laughing while accepting her EOE award alongside two others

How to Find Your Voice at the Leadership Table

Looking for ways to ensure that your voice is heard at the leadership table? Alisha T. DeTroye, MMS, PA-C, DFAAPA, director of PA Services at Wake Forest Baptist Health and president-elect of North Carolina Academy of PAs, shares her tips.

PA Krisi Gindlesperger’s Path to Leadership

How a PA climbed the leadership ladder, learned the business of medicine, and became a major player in the industry – Krisi Gindlesperger’s inspiring PA career path. Learn more about CHLM’s programs for PA leaders.

PAs in Administration: Higher Salaries and Job Satisfaction

PAs in management and administration tend to be paid more, have access to leadership training and an identified career path, and are more satisfied with their employers.

Early-Career PAs Share Leadership Advice

At AAPA’s 2018 Leadership and Advocacy Summit, four PA panelists spoke passionately about the value of leadership for young PAs and the need to make leadership an early-career priority.

From PA to President: David Claeys’s Career Trajectory

David Claeys, PA-C, served in many different hospital roles before his October 2017 appointment as president of Beaumont Health, Dearborn, a 632-bed hospital.

PAs in Administration

For Sheri A. Shebairo, MBA, PA-C, getting to the bottom of an issue has been a driving force throughout her professional life. Her first career was as a television news reporter in New York, but she always knew she wanted to have a more personal impact on the lives of others.

JAAPA Articles on Administration

Read articles on administration in JAAPA, the peer-reviewed clinical journal of AAPA, published for more than 25 years.

Kris Pyles-Sweet, MS, PA-C; Travis Randolph, PA-C; Emily WhiteHorse, Ph.D., PA-C; Melissa Ricker, PA-C

Insider Tips on Popular PA Specialties

PAs know that career flexibility is a built-in benefit of the profession. But it can be overwhelming to think about transitioning specialties. Do you have enough experience? What’s the best way to get your foot in the door? Four experts share their insights.

Horses on the street in Wheeler County

Frontier Medicine: One County, One PA

Amanda Roy, PA-C, is the only healthcare provider for all of Wheeler County, Oregon. She discusses what she finds rewarding about frontier medicine, the significance of precepting in her career, and what it means to her that her patients trust her so much.

Rural field

Country Living: Working as a PA in Rural Healthcare

Things are different in the country, and healthcare is no exception. PAs who leave the big city to work in the country are in for a unique and rewarding experience. Here’s what a few PAs had to say about working in a rural setting.

Sharmila Sewell performing a medication reconciliation in her patient's home

PAs Help Close Gaps in Care Through House Calls

As an in-home healthcare provider, Sarah Kaplan, PA-C, is among a rapidly growing number of medical professionals who are revitalizing the once-common practice of bringing urgent and primary care services directly into the homes of their patients.

Brittany Hager and Kathryn LaFleur smiling

A Primary Care PA Answers Your Most Pressing Questions

Kasey Brundidge, a primary care PA, sets the record straight on PA students’ most pressing practice questions. Here, she addresses the wide range of medical knowledge needed, patient volume, burnout, salary, and schedule questions.

A Day in the Life of a PA in Primary Care

I’ve been working in family medicine for two years now. Some things we do every day may seem routine, but there is nothing ordinary about how we care for our patients. Here is a recent day at my practice.

JAAPA Articles on Family Medicine

Read articles on family medicine in JAAPA, the peer-reviewed clinical journal of AAPA, published for more than 25 years.

Timothy Grace headshot

Maine Hospitalist Reflects on Life-Changing Decision to Become a PA

From serving in the United States Air Force to selling modular healthcare furniture, an unlikely path led Timothy M. Grace, PA-C, to become a PA. Grace is committed to ensuring that those in the profession advocate for modernizing PA practice.

Erin Stutz headshot

A Day in the Life of a PA in a Medical ICU

Erin Stutz, PA-C, works in pulmonary critical care in the medical ICU at the University of Rochester Medical Center (URMC). She shares what her days are like, and why the upcoming Adult Hospital Medicine Boot Camp is worth your time.

Deadly Mistake Averted: Leads to Better Procedures at Hospital

A medication error sustained by PA Corey Asbell following arthroscopic surgery led to new hospital procedures in the pharmacy rather than a lawsuit.

Hospital ER PA and MD Make Three Changes to Improve Teamwork

PA and MD will talk at CHLM’s Executive Leadership Conference about the three changes they have made in the ER to collaborate as a team to better serve patients.

How AAPA’s Online Community Helped Save My Patient’s Life

AAPA’s online member community, Huddle, celebrated its 3rd birthday in July. We asked members to contribute any Huddle-related stories and got this one about “How Huddle Saved My Patient’s Life”!

What It’s Really Like to be a PA in Hospital Medicine

Hospitals are one of PAs’ largest employer groups, and hospital medicine is an ever-changing practice setting. Learn about one hospital internal medicine PA’s daily routine.

From PA to President: David Claeys’s Career Trajectory

David Claeys, PA-C, served in many different hospital roles before his October 2017 appointment as president of Beaumont Health, Dearborn, a 632-bed hospital.

PAs in Hospitals: 10 Fast Facts

Based on data derived from the 2017 AAPA Salary Report, the AAPA Research Department identified ten facts about PAs in hospitals.

JAAPA Articles on Hospital Medicine

Read articles on hospital medicine in JAAPA, the peer-reviewed clinical journal of AAPA, published for more than 25 years.

Kris Pyles-Sweet, MS, PA-C; Travis Randolph, PA-C; Emily WhiteHorse, Ph.D., PA-C; Melissa Ricker, PA-C

Insider Tips on Popular PA Specialties

PAs know that career flexibility is a built-in benefit of the profession. But it can be overwhelming to think about transitioning specialties. Do you have enough experience? What’s the best way to get your foot in the door? Four experts share their insights.

Rural field

Country Living: Working as a PA in Rural Healthcare

Things are different in the country, and healthcare is no exception. PAs who leave the big city to work in the country are in for a unique and rewarding experience. Here’s what a few PAs had to say about working in a rural setting.

Sharmila Sewell performing a medication reconciliation in her patient's home

PAs Help Close Gaps in Care Through House Calls

As an in-home healthcare provider, Sarah Kaplan, PA-C, is among a rapidly growing number of medical professionals who are revitalizing the once-common practice of bringing urgent and primary care services directly into the homes of their patients.

Brittany Hager and Kathryn LaFleur smiling

A Primary Care PA Answers Your Most Pressing Questions

Kasey Brundidge, a primary care PA, sets the record straight on PA students’ most pressing practice questions. Here, she addresses the wide range of medical knowledge needed, patient volume, burnout, salary, and schedule questions.

A Day in the Life of a PA in Primary Care

I’ve been working in family medicine for two years now. Some things we do every day may seem routine, but there is nothing ordinary about how we care for our patients. Here is a recent day at my practice.

JAAPA Articles on Internal Medicine

Read articles on internal medicine in JAAPA, the peer-reviewed clinical journal of AAPA, published for more than 25 years.

Kris Pyles-Sweet, MS, PA-C; Travis Randolph, PA-C; Emily WhiteHorse, Ph.D., PA-C; Melissa Ricker, PA-C

Insider Tips on Popular PA Specialties

PAs know that career flexibility is a built-in benefit of the profession. But it can be overwhelming to think about transitioning specialties. Do you have enough experience? What’s the best way to get your foot in the door? Four experts share their insights.

Alyssa Zantello

PAs on the Front Lines: Alyssa Zantello Helps New York City During COVID-19

As the COVID-19 surge began in the U.S., Alyssa Zantello, PA-C, who practices orthopaedics in Michigan, found she couldn’t sit at home and do nothing. Forty eight hours after a conversation with her mentor, she was on a plane to New York City.

A Career in Orthopaedics: Why I Love the Specialty

Almas Abbas, PA-C, grew up playing sports – and getting injured. Her on-field experiences inspired an early interest in how the body works and how best to treat herself, and eventually led to a career as a PA in orthopaedics.

Dana Urban with her classmates

PA Inspires Patient to Follow in her Footsteps

Dana Urban has known she’s wanted to be a PA since she was 12 years old. In 2005, she met Amanda Asaro, MPAS, PA-C, who was part of her healthcare team. Asaro’s compassion, kindness, and care made a lasting impact on her patient.

Dan Acevedo pointing at a patient's x-ray

A Week in the Life of a PA in Orthopaedics

Daniel Acevedo, a PA in orthopaedics at OrthoVirginia in Lynchburg, Virginia, sees a lot in a typical week: five to seven surgeries, hospital consultations, hip fracture clinics, post-op patients, outpatient procedures at an ambulatory surgery center, and more.

A Day in the Life of a PA in Orthopaedic Surgery

I enjoy being a physician assistant because my work is challenging, yet very rewarding. I am able to practice medicine within a multidisciplinary team where I consult with my supervising physicians daily. Here’s what a recent day was like for me.

JAAPA Articles on Orthopaedic Surgery

Read articles on orthpaedic surgery in in JAAPA, the peer-reviewed clinical journal of AAPA, published for more than 25 years.

D.C. PA Helps Create Better PPE for Airway Procedures

When COVID-19 hit Washington, D.C., emergency medicine PA Amy Keim observed that the plastic drapes being used to decrease aerosolized particles during airway procedures weren’t cutting it. So she set out to make something better: the Airway Procedure Tent.

Katherine Thompson

How PAs Can Provide Compassionate Care to Survivors of Interpersonal Violence

AAPA enlisted Katherine Thompson, PA-C, a practicing PA in emergency medicine and urgent care for four years, to respond to Huddle’s Ask Me on interpersonal violence (IPV) and forensic medicine. Read her advice on how healthcare providers can identify and manage IPV survivors.

Nicole Dettmann

2020 PA of the Year Has Volunteered in Bolivia for More Than 20 Years

Nicole Dettmann, DSc, MPH, PA-C, is AAPA’s 2020 PA of the Year. Dettmann works in the emergency department at Newton Wellesley in Massachusetts and has volunteered with the Foundación de Salud del Rio Beni in Bolivia for more than 20 years.

Johnnie Gilpen in 1996 stationed in Tunisia

How a Helicopter Crew Chief and Bioterrorism Expert Ended Up a PA

Johnnie Gilpen, PA-C, had a long and varied career by the time he was accepted to the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center PA program in 2017. His unique career path led him to where he is today: an emergency medicine PA and an involved leader.

PA Jiselle Del Cid examining a patient

PAs Respond in El Paso Shooting Aftermath

Two PAs with Envision Physician Services responded within minutes to the shooting at a Walmart store in El Paso, Texas. “It was like a war zone…The moment all of them came in, it’s like a gear in my head turned.”

Vituity Emergency Medicine PA Fellows

A Day or Night in the Life of an Emergency Medicine Fellow

Stephen Lewia, PA-C, has spent the past few months as a Vituity Emergency Medicine PA Fellow at Arrowhead Medical Center in Colton, California. He shares his insights about the experience and about balancing life with being a new PA.

Dave Sander with a couple members of his DMAT and a Customs and Border Protection Special Unit officer talking to a local in Puerto Rico

How PAs Can Use Their Skills in Disaster Medicine

Interested in using your skills to help communities in need after a disaster? Four PAs offer their best advice for getting involved, from participating in trainings and minimizing harm to being patient throughout the process.

Erin Stutz headshot

A Day in the Life of a PA in a Medical ICU

Erin Stutz, PA-C, works in pulmonary critical care in the medical ICU at the University of Rochester Medical Center (URMC). She shares what her days are like, and why the upcoming Adult Hospital Medicine Boot Camp is worth your time.

Hospital ER PA and MD Make Three Changes to Improve Teamwork

PA and MD will talk at CHLM’s Executive Leadership Conference about the three changes they have made in the ER to collaborate as a team to better serve patients.

How to Help Provide Emergency Disaster Services

Most PAs don’t hesitate to use their skills and training to help others in need. Have you wondered how to help people before, during, and after natural disasters? Here are some things you need to know.

What You Always Wanted to Know About EMPAs, But Were Afraid to Ask

In this article written for the American College of Osteopathic Emergency Physicians, the Society of Emergency Medicine Physician Assistants (SEMPA) provides a brief history of emergency medicine PAs (EMPA), gives a primer on PA training and discusses EMPA onboarding and utilization.

JAAPA Articles on Emergency Medicine

Read articles on emergency medicine in JAAPA, the peer-reviewed clinical journal of AAPA, published for more than 25 years.

A telehealth visit

PAs Embrace Telemedicine After COVID-19 Jumpstart

Although most PAs did not use telemedicine in their practices before COVID-19, AAPA’s Research Department reports in a recent data brief that PAs are now embracing telemedicine to provide remote, high-quality care to their patients. Several comment on how their jobs have changed.

A telehealth visit

CMS Expands Medicare Telemedicine Coverage

CMS announced expanded Medicare telehealth coverage to enable beneficiaries to receive a wider range of healthcare services without having to travel to an office, clinic or health care facility. Previously, Medicare was only allowed to pay health professionals for telemedicine services in certain situations.

Huddle Ask Me Session Telemedicine graphic

Virtual Health PAs Share Insight to Rapidly Growing Healthcare Space

Huddle’s latest Ask Me session recruited virtual medicine PAs Desmond Watt and Amanda Shelley to engage in field-related discussions with AAPA members. Virtual health, or telemedicine, is an emerging healthcare space that PAs have the opportunity to not only join, but lead.

Brian holding his EOE award

This PA Telemedicine Director Thinks You Should Explore a Career in Virtual Medicine

Telemedicine Director Brian Headley, PA, says it would be wise for PAs to be aware of current changes in telemedicine. For PAs looking to increase their value to their employer, this is a burgeoning field with lots of potential.

PA Nazila Shagagi and Dr. Vo via Bentley, the telemedicine robot

The Top 7 Things Every PA Should Know About Virtual Medicine and Telemedicine

What do virtual medicine, telehealth, telemedicine mean? And how might they affect you and your daily practice? Desmond Watt, PA-C, president of the PAs in Virtual Medicine and Telemedicine special interest group, shares what you should know.

Urgent Care, a Fast Growing Specialty for PAs and Physicians

Urgent care medicine is the “provision of immediate medical service offering outpatient care for the treatment of acute and chronic illness and injury”. PAs in urgent care should have a vast array of clinical skills as well as the ability to quickly identify patients who require more intensive emergency medicine services. While urgent care providers may also be the first to diagnosis chronic diseases such as diabetes or asthma, they generally refer patients to a primary care provider for the management of these conditions.

PAs are Key to Ortho Urgent Care Model

PA John Mohnickey, a longtime entrepreneur, recognized the need and developed Prompt Ortho. This practice model has been adopted by more than 100 clinics across the United States.

20 things to know about urgent care

Did you know that PAs are part of the preferred staffing model for urgent care? Becker’s Hospital Review outlined 20 things to know about urgent care based on data found in the Urgent Care Association of America’s “2016 Benchmarking Report.”

JAAPA Articles on Urgent Care

Read articles on urgent care in JAAPA, the peer-reviewed clinical journal of AAPA, published for more than 25 years.

Networking and Jobs

Networking and Jobs

Job Opportunities in Administration

Search for current jobs on PA JobSource. Filter by location, job function, experience level and more.

Job Opportunities in Dermatology

Search for current jobs on PA JobSource. Filter by location, job function, experience level and more.

Job Opportunities in Education

Search for current jobs on PA JobSource. Filter by location, job function, experience level and more.

Job Opportunities in Family Medicine

Search for current jobs on PA JobSource. Filter by location, job function, experience level and more.

Job Opportunities in Hospital Medicine

Search for current jobs on PA JobSource. Filter by location, job function, experience level and more.

Job Opportunities in Internal Medicine

Search for current jobs on PA JobSource. Filter by location, job function, experience level and more.

Job Opportunities in Emergency Medicine

Search for current jobs on PA JobSource. Filter by location, job function, experience level and more.

Job Opportunities in Orthopaedic Surgery

Search for current jobs on PA JobSource. Filter by location, job function, experience level and more.

Job Opportunities in Telemedicine

Search for current jobs on PA JobSource. Filter by location, job function, experience level and more.

Job Opportunities in Urgent Care

Search for current jobs on PA JobSource. Filter by location, job function, experience level and more.

Connect with PAs in Administration on Huddle

Find PAs and PA students by location, specialty, PA program and more using the advanced search function on Huddle, AAPA’s members-only community.

Mentor Match Volunteers: Mentors Needed!

Explore Mentor Match in Huddle and find a PA student or new PA who could use your professional and valuable advice.

AAPA Conference 2021

Unite with your peers at AAPA 2021 and remember the reason you became a PA. Registration is now open!

Connect with PAs in Dermatology on Huddle

Find PAs and PA students by location, specialty, PA program and more using the advanced search function on Huddle, AAPA’s members-only community.

Mentor Match Volunteers: Mentors Needed!

Explore Mentor Match in Huddle and find a PA student or new PA who could use your professional and valuable advice.

AAPA Conference 2021

Unite with your peers at AAPA 2021 and remember the reason you became a PA. Registration is now open!

Connect with PAs in Education on Huddle

Find PAs and PA students by location, specialty, PA program and more using the advanced search function on Huddle, AAPA’s members-only community.

Mentor Match Volunteers: Mentors Needed!

Explore Mentor Match in Huddle and find a PA student or new PA who could use your professional and valuable advice.

AAPA Conference 2021

Unite with your peers at AAPA 2021 and remember the reason you became a PA. Registration is now open!

Connect with Family Medicine PAs on Huddle

Find PAs and PA students by location, specialty, PA program and more using the advanced search function on Huddle, AAPA’s members-only community.

Mentor Match Volunteers: Mentors Needed!

Explore Mentor Match in Huddle and find a PA student or new PA who could use your professional and valuable advice.

AAPA Conference 2021

Unite with your peers at AAPA 2021 and remember the reason you became a PA. Registration is now open!

Connect with Hospital Medicine PAs on Huddle

Find PAs and PA students by location, specialty, PA program and more using the advanced search function on Huddle, AAPA’s members-only community.

Mentor Match Volunteers: Mentors Needed!

Explore Mentor Match in Huddle and find a PA student or new PA who could use your professional and valuable advice.

AAPA Conference 2021

Unite with your peers at AAPA 2021 and remember the reason you became a PA. Registration is now open!

Connect with Internal Medicine PAs on Huddle

Find PAs and PA students by location, specialty, PA program and more using the advanced search function on Huddle, AAPA’s members-only community.

Mentor Match Volunteers: Mentors Needed!

Explore Mentor Match in Huddle and find a PA student or new PA who could use your professional and valuable advice.

AAPA Conference 2021

Unite with your peers at AAPA 2021 and remember the reason you became a PA. Registration is now open!

Connect with Orthopaedic Surgery PAs on Huddle

Find PAs and PA students by location, specialty, PA program and more using the advanced search function on Huddle, AAPA’s members-only community.

Mentor Match Volunteers: Mentors Needed!

Explore Mentor Match in Huddle and find a PA student or new PA who could use your professional and valuable advice.

AAPA Conference 2021

Unite with your peers at AAPA 2021 and remember the reason you became a PA. Registration is now open!

Connect with Emergency Medicine PAs on Huddle

Find PAs and PA students by location, specialty, PA program and more using the advanced search function on Huddle, AAPA’s members-only community.

Mentor Match Volunteers: Mentors Needed!

Explore Mentor Match in Huddle and find a PA student or new PA who could use your professional and valuable advice.

AAPA Conference 2021

Unite with your peers at AAPA 2021 and remember the reason you became a PA. Registration is now open!

Join the Telemedicine Conversation on Huddle

AAPA members are asking questions and sharing advice regarding telemedicine on Huddle. Join one of the existing threads on this important topic or start your own.

Mentor Match Volunteers: Mentors Needed!

Explore Mentor Match in Huddle and find a PA student or new PA who could use your professional and valuable advice.

AAPA Conference 2021

Unite with your peers at AAPA 2021 and remember the reason you became a PA. Registration is now open!

Connect with PAs in Urgent Care on Huddle

Find PAs and PA students by location, specialty, PA program and more using the advanced search function on Huddle, AAPA’s members-only community.

Mentor Match Volunteers: Mentors Needed!

Explore Mentor Match in Huddle and find a PA student or new PA who could use your professional and valuable advice.

AAPA Conference 2021

Unite with your peers at AAPA 2021 and remember the reason you became a PA. Registration is now open!

Words from the Field

Words from the Field

 

Making the Transition From a Clinical to an Administrative Role

I transitioned to an administrative role in our large healthcare system two years ago. I have a standard MHS, not an MHA or MBA. The transition was challenging. There was a steep learning curve, but I survived because of the unrelenting work ethic and leadership skills that are inherent to the PA profession. These characteristics make us natural choices for leadership and administrative positions.

 

Before the Degree, Think About Your Goals

If you are considering an additional degree, the type of degree you seek should depend on your planned trajectory. If you are trying to prepare yourself for an administrative position but do not have a particular focus in mind, an MBA or MHA would suffice. If your role will be in education (fellowship/residency director, CME coordinator, curriculum development, etc.), a D.Ed. may be more applicable.

 

Begin as a Volunteer

If you have any interest in healthcare administration, I strongly suggest that you volunteer for your state PA organization and then run for a board position. You’ll learn a lot about not only the business of medicine but the legislation and regulation of it. As a bonus, you will make some good friends in powerful positions!

 

Choose Your Field of Interest in Administration

What you do in the realm of “administration” can vary depending on your interest. There are administrative opportunities for clinicians with an interest in public health. I moved into a public health clinical consultant role and later a public health advisor role with the federal government. I was able to do this with my PA degree, although I am currently completing a doctoral degree in health sciences. My work largely involves health policy and programming for underserved populations. I lead a number of health focused programs (diabetes, oral health, adult immunizations, etc.) for my office and the department. There are opportunities if you are flexible.

 

Doors Are Opening for PAs

10 years ago, it was not easy for me to get into a leadership role as a PA. PAs didn’t have a formal leadership track back then. A lot has changed in the last 10 years, and healthcare has really evolved; the sheer number of PAs nationally (along with other advanced practice roles) has grown, and an increased number of leadership roles are becoming role agnostic. I am excited to see the doors open and look forward to seeing many more PA leaders make a meaningful impact in healthcare and healthcare delivery.

 

Advice for Making the Transition to Dermatology

First, you should look into joining your state and/or national dermatology organizations. This is the best place to gain access to dermatology education and to network with other derm PAs. Most dermatology positions never get posted on a job board because it’s all word of mouth.

Second, go to a conference! The SDPA puts on two great conferences every year, and most state organizations have conferences as well. Conferences are a great way to get some dermatology under your belt or learn how to care for derm patients in your primary care clinics.

Last, ask a local PA to shadow. If you are already working in another specialty, ask to spend a couple hours following a derm PA to see what they do and learn from them what you can.

The final advice I will give you is to stay positive and be patient! Once you get into derm, you never leave.

 

The Art of Cosmetic Dermatology

Cosmetic dermatology is a unique specialty in many ways. You must have a passion for it to excel at it. Unlike other fields, patients have to want to see you and spend their hard-earned money with you; they don’t need to see you. It’s important to be comfortable with the creativity required to achieve the desired result for your patients. Enthusiasm and empathy will be the keys to your success in this field.

Every patient is unique and requires a unique treatment plan. Learning what will give the best outcome to each patient can only be learned through practice. The best skills training is done on the job, seeing patient after patient, developing and carrying out treatment plans. Basic skills can be learned at a workshop or conference, but true skill is developed over years of practice, as is the case for any artist.

 

Trust Your Training and Know When to Ask for Help

Transitioning from specialty to primary care may not be as hard as one expects. First, PAs are educated in general medicine. The foundation we receive helps us to pivot into different specialties, not the other way around. Second, having a specialty background could augment your primary practice.

Specific items that may help a PA’s chances would be to acknowledge your specialty background and how it complements the general medical practice within a cover letter. Volunteering at the local free clinic permits a PA the ability to garner hands-on experience and builds the curriculum vitae. If a PA is planning to transition to primary care in the future, going on a mission trip is a great way to obtain experience.

PAs are trained in the generalist model. We have a base of knowledge on which one can rely. Brushing up on reading and completing CMEs in the most common illnesses and areas of concern is a good start. The Journal of American Academy of PAs (JAAPA) is an excellent resource for AAPA members. Also, no one practices in a vacuum. Help is only a phone call away if no one is in the clinic to ask a question. Medicine is an art and instinct on top of our education. I remember walking in on a physician looking up answers in a book. He looked at my shocked expression and explained that no one knows all the answers. Since then, I live by the rules: Trust your training, research your questions, and never worry alone.

 

Find Your Sub-Focus Area of Expertise

Internal Medicine will bring you variety in your medicine practice. Within it, you can develop a sub-focus of expertise and be the expert in your practice if you so desire. For example, Hepatitis C treatment and management is shifting to Primary Care and this is a terrific area to develop expertise within your practice. Endocrinology focus is another area, whether diabetes management, thyroid, or bone health. Sports medicine is another area and a PA in Internal Medicine who is good at orthopedics is a terrific addition to a primary care practice. All Internal Medicine practices needs providers who have a specific area of special interest, and PAs can fit in well in this arena.

After several years in IM, I gained the clinical foundation that would allow me to move to a specialty practice area if so desired ¬– but I found my greatest satisfaction in caring for families and the relationships between provider and patient.

 

Building Long-Term Relationships

There is a lot of paperwork, emails, and phone calls but the reward of building a long-term relationship with your clients is worth it. It helps to remind myself to think about how I would want my family treated.

 

A Challenging and Highly Complex Specialty

Family Medicine is, in my not-so-humble opinion, one of the most difficult specialties in medicine. This “womb to tomb” care, encompassing knowledge of a wide range of acute and chronic conditions in all organ systems, along with behavioral medicine, preventive medicine, and care coordination of complex geriatric, post-transplant, mental health, and oncology patients, is also one of the most rewarding. Nearly every patient requires skilled motivational interviewing to achieve a health behavior change, and the therapeutic relationships that develop over time offer tremendous professional satisfaction.

Becoming comfortable with uncertainty, knowing when to apply the tincture of time, shared decision-making, and leveraging your resources are essential skills to learn early-on. It took me nearly 3 years of full-time experience being supervised by teaching family physicians and PAs to feel confident that I could independently determine the next best step for any patient who walked in the door, even when I had no idea what the diagnosis was. Differentials are endless; the one you didn’t consider will be the one you miss, with uncommon presentations of the common as the norm. The variety of conditions seen, unpredictability of each day, and constant challenge of chief complaints that don’t match chief concerns work to keep me on my toes and looking forward to tackling every shift. After 20 years of practice and teaching family medicine, I continue to value and utilize physician collaboration in delivering effective primary care to my own panel of patients.

 

Wearing Multiple Hats

Family practice clinicians must be part psychiatrist, social worker, pediatrician, gynecologist, geriatrician, dermatologist, orthopedic, pain management provider, ENT, urgent care, gastroenterologist, minor surgeons, insurance prior authorization paperwork specialist, and after hours emergency medication refiller, just to name a few.

The reward is the continuity of care and if you are lucky, you’ll see that 2-week-old baby into adulthood knowing you were part of keeping her healthy, along with her siblings and parents.

 

This Specialty Surprised Me

I never imagined going into primary care. It just didn’t seem as exciting as being in a specialty. I took the job in primary care due to good benefits and compensation straight out of school and thought I could get a good base knowledge of family practice and get a job elsewhere when it became available. In primary care, I am able to keep up on the latest changes in diabetes, hypertension, and other chronic illnesses that almost all specialties need to be aware of. Twelve years later, here I am, still doing primary care, and I couldn’t be happier. I feel that in primary care the sky is the limit.

 

Expect a Little of Everything

EM is a field that is general in scope. You have to know a little bit (or more) of every specialty. You perform a lot of procedures, it is fast paced, and can be high stress. It’s tough to prepare for and requires a lot of self-directed study while managing a full case load.

 

Before You Transition to Emergency Medicine

I loved EM from the start and my experience with pre-hospital care really paid off. I have worked everything from a Trauma Center to a Solo ER in a tiny rural hospital. How much responsibility you have will depend on the protocol and how experienced and comfortable the supervisors/hospitals are with PAs/NPs, as well as their particular needs. It would benefit you to speak with potential site staff prior to accepting a position, as well as shadowing.

It is best to get a couple years of IM or FP prior to taking an ER position. It provides the comfort of introducing yourself to the patient as their provider, and helps you develop a sense of what a sick patient really looks like. You will need both adult and peds experience for EM. You would also benefit from experience with orthopedics and surgery, but your clinical rotations might provide sufficiently for this. You should be skilled in reading X-rays, and have a speaking knowledge of CTs and US. Even if you don’t manage the complicated cases, the ability to convey to the specialist exactly what is wrong with your patient is critical.

 

Why I Chose an Emergency Medicine Fellowship

Before starting PA school, I practiced as a Nationally Registered Paramedic for ten years. Needless to say, Emergency Medicine (EM) was my specialty of choice very early in my PA journey. When applying for jobs during my clinical year, I began looking into formal postgraduate training as an alternative to a traditional first job.

I chose a fellowship for several reasons. First, I knew that I learn best in an academic setting. I wanted to learn EM through both hands-on and didactic education. To enable opportunities to acquire the broad knowledge needed to practice Emergency Medicine, EM fellowships commonly include non-EM rotations and training and I personally saw value in the variety of experiences I would gain while in an EM fellowship. Lastly, and to me most importantly, I wanted my professional development to take precedence over productivity. While many have found professional development though non-fellowship opportunities, I decided to seek them in a fellowship.

 

Solving the Medical Puzzles

I personally enjoy the problem-solving aspect of rapid responses. Sometimes, the issues are simple. For example, we’ll have a patient who has flash pulmonary edema and needs IV Lasix and BiPAP. At other times, the patients have extensive medical problems with multiple organ systems affected. We’ll bring on any additional teams we need to consult with, and then we collaborate on the decisions. I really enjoy strategizing options, talking with the patient and their family, and then sharing the information with my team. It’s one of the parts of my job I find most satisfying.

 

Licensing Considerations

Be sure to know where your patients are located. If you live near a state border, and work with patients living in multiple states, you may need to be licensed in multiple states.

 

Innovations in Telemedicine

Virtual care is being used in just about every specialty in some capacity. It ranges from direct-to-consumer, app-based care to video visits, peer-to-peer consults, home-based monitoring of things like INRs, BP, etc., to a hub-and-spoke model with the larger hospital center offering care to outlying hospitals.

There are tools available for physical exam such as an auscultation device, otoscope, ophthalmoscope, skin cameras, and so on to augment the physical exam part of virtual care. These would be maneuvered by a support person typically, (MA or nurse), in a clinic or even at the patient’s home. We’re seeing this happening in kiosk setups in retail clinics as well.

 

Using Telemedicine for All It’s Worth

I’ve spoken to enough PAs about this to know there seems to be a mystique around telemedicine as individuals have a hard time understanding exactly how it works, or how it could work for their patients. But this is simply care being provided in a non-traditional space. Telemedicine is not a lesser version of care where access or services are limited. This idea does a disservice to the potential impact of telemedicine on healthcare. Many studies indicate that telemedicine is cost-effective, and of equivalent quality to traditional in-person care for a variety of clinical concerns. This is not to say telemedicine should replace in-person care, but rather that we should seek to define the areas where it ought to. Telemedicine allows us to think of medical care as more of a matrix: The right care should be provided at the right time, in the right place, by the right clinician.

 

An Opportunity for PAs

I think change is tough and we all know that medicine as a whole is lethargic when it comes to the adoption of new things, whether adopting practice standards or technology. It would be wise for us all to be, at least superficially, aware of the changes we are currently seeing in telemedicine. Insofar as career moves for other PAs, this niche is only growing. For PAs looking to increase their value to their employer, this is a burgeoning field with lots of potential and little experience.

 

The Myth of the 9-5 Job

Teaching was and continues to be my first passion as I started my professional career as a teacher before becoming a PA. Many PAs hear that by moving into an education position, they will have a lot more flexibility. While that is true to an extent, there are also some trade-offs.

Although it is generally easier for you to get release time from work to care for an ill child or family member, attend an event, and even take a sick day, the workload is different. In clinical practice, for the most part, you have a set schedule you work plus the time needed to complete your charts. But education is not an 8-5 job. Although you may have to be on campus from 9-5, the fact is most of us do our work in the evenings and during the weekends. This is because our days are filled with classroom time, program and university meetings, and student interactions. One of the most common challenges new faculty experience is how much work they have to do at home.

 

Earning a Faculty Position

Many PA programs look for 3-5 years clinical experience and require some teaching experience for principal/core faculty positions. More and more, PA programs/universities are also requiring PAs to provide scholarly work and meaningful research, which is another entirely different skill set.

There is not much time to develop these new skills and still learn clinical medicine. The best way to get started is 1) precept students, 2) if in a hospital, get involved in some education activities like leading a noon conference, journal club, or case discussion, 3) contact local PA programs and volunteer to give lectures in your area of expertise. Not every PA program is able to pay for these single lectures and providing this voluntary service can be rewarding. All these activities will bolster your CV and chances of a faculty position in a few years.

 

It’s All About the Students

The best part of being a faculty member is witnessing the students grow and learn an incredible amount of information in 26 months. I am filled with gratitude that I get to go on this journey with them. Any time spent with the students is always my favorite part of this job.

 

Want To Be a PA Program Director?

Having a solid clinical background not only helps you to teach but makes you much more credible. If you want to be a program director, I think ideally you should be full-time faculty for a few years and take on administrative positions of increasing responsibility (course director, clinical or academic coordinator, etc.)

When I was faculty, most PAs (and many faculty) did not have graduate degrees. I think that having a master’s in administration not only helped me to obtain my faculty position, but also was useful in a number of areas of teaching.

One potentially ideal degree would be a doctorate in education (and if it were medical education, all the better) with a major in administration. That would, in my mind, be most precisely focused on the skill set for a PA program director and might give a bit of a competitive advantage over someone without a doctorate, or someone with a doctorate that was not as perfectly designed for the position. It also might compensate for having somewhat less PA education or administrative experience.

 

Diseases I See the Most

I’ve been a hospitalist since I graduated PA school and don’t regret it at all. There is really no specific way to prepare but to jump in and start seeing patients. I would say that the most common diseases we see are CHF, NSTEMI, MIs, arrhythmias, syncope, altered mental status, chest pains, pneumonia, COPD, pleural effusions, CVAs, anemias, UTIs, bacteremia, and more. If you are starting out from PA school, I would recommend you read about the above diseases. Also, I strongly recommend that you work for a hospital/group that gives you autonomy and allows you to independently see patients.

 

Advice for a Bad Day

A great hospitalist taught me, when things are going badly, ask yourself, “What could we be doing to harm the patient?” It often brings you back to a detailed investigation of the existing orders.

 

How to Know if Hospital Medicine Could Be Right for You

When I started PA school, I didn’t know which specialty I wanted to practice. I eagerly listened to all the lectures in PA school and spent my year-plus on rotations. What I found was that I liked a little bit of everything and was drawn to the hospital setting. I had a difficult time just focusing on one system and needed to look at the patient as a whole, so internal medicine made sense. Also, I liked the acuity of hospitalized patients and the fast pace and variability of days in the hospital.

 

Helping Patients at Their Most Vulnerable

I’m always looking forward to my next shift. I learn so much not only from patients but from the science behind it. I’ve developed a fondness for the science of medicine and that grows into how you tell people what’s going on with their bodies. I have a few friends who are very successful in business. They are financially well off, but nothing is more powerful to me than being a provider and helping someone when they are at their most vulnerable.

 

Managing a Busy Schedule

The waiting room can get pretty full, and the wait can get pretty long. I have had to work hard to not get distracted, thrown off, and overwhelmed by the press of waiting patients when it’s busy. On the other hand, not having scheduled appointments means strep throat really can take five minutes and abdominal pain really can take 30 – it takes as long as it takes to do the work right. I have succeeded in reframing my mental expectations to: “I don’t have appointments; therefore I am never running late.”

I have insisted on the right to close the schedule if it gets too busy near the end of the day. The clinic remains open for triage, but there are times we just can’t keep taking patients until scheduled closing time. There’s only one of me and I can only think for so long. And it’s my responsibility to know my own limits.

 

Practice Makes Perfect

Surgery is one of the areas where direct personal experience is the best teacher. All of the textbooks in the world are not going to be as valuable as actually being confronted with fractures. I always joked that I learned orthopedics one fracture at a time while working in the ER and UC.

It is important to work with a surgeon who is a good teacher and realizes that you are a new grad or new to the specialty. He or she must make themselves immediately available to you as you go down to the ER to do a consult. Having an opportunity to review imaging and discuss a treatment plan with your surgeon before you go down to the ER will help you show the ER attendings and staff that you are competent and prepared.

Figure out the most common Dxs that your practice sees and consults on, and study these. Know how your surgeon treats various fractures (they don’t always follow the “book”). Be prepared to take a long time to feel confident and competent. Surgery is a complex business and it takes a long time for anyone to see enough case variety to get comfortable.

 

How to Push the Envelope

I’ve been the first PA in a few roles, and, admittedly, pushed the envelope. I was the first surgical PA in a small hospital (had been working in the ER for a while and they wanted to try PAs in the OR). One way to push the envelope is to go to recovery with the patient and offer to write the note or orders for the surgeon. Make rounds on them the next day. Learn what the surgeon looks for and how they handle it.

 

Character Traits of Successful PAs in Orthopaedics

One of the most important character traits in orthopaedics is being adaptable. You should be able to adapt on the go with scheduling changes (OR cases canceled or cases go longer than expected), and handling complicated patients with multiple comorbidities. Efficiency is another key in orthopaedics. It is important to be very thorough but yet concise. Most ortho clinics have a high volume of patients with only 10-15 minute visit slots for each patient. I also think that humility should be one of the main components of a physician assistant regardless of the medical specialty. Never get to the point where you refuse to admit when you are wrong. This is true when treating patients and dealing with colleagues.

 

Looking for Variety? Try Orthopaedics

Orthopaedics is one of the most popular specialties for PAs – with good reason! One of the best things about being a PA in orthopaedics is that there is so much variation in what your job could entail. I have worked for hospital-owned, military, and private practices, and operated out of both hospital operating rooms and ambulatory surgery centers. My routine includes a rewarding mix of inpatient and outpatient clinics, and surgery. I often work with several surgeons in a week, which means that I may be doing arthroscopies one day and total joint replacements the next.

 

The Reward of Seeing It Through

For me, continuity of care is exceptionally satisfying. I love that I see a patient in the emergency department who has suffered an orthopaedic trauma, then shepherd them through the process of surgical management and postoperative care on the wards, and finally, see them back in the office. I am glad that, at each step of their journey, they are seeing a familiar face.

External Resources

External Resources

American College of Healthcare Executives

The American College of Healthcare Executives (ACHE) is a membership association focused on advancing leaders in the field of healthcare management. PAs interested in a career in administration are encouraged to take advantage of the educational offerings that are available through the AAPA/ACHE Leadership Learning Collaborative and to consider pursuing ACHE’s FACHE credential.

Society of Hospital Medicine

Some PAs who work as administrators in a hospital setting choose to belong to both AAPA and the Society of Hospital Medicine (SHM). SHM provides hospital medicine-specific opportunities, including education, professional development, networking, advocacy, and leadership development.

American Association of Healthcare Administrative Management

The American Association of Healthcare Administrative Management (AAHAM) is a professional organization dedicated to healthcare administrative management. PAs working in healthcare administration may benefit from the information, education, and advocacy that AAHAM provides in the areas of reimbursement, admitting and registration, data management, medical records, and patient relations.

Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society

The Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society (HIMSS) serves the global health information and technology community and is uniquely positioned to provide guidance on best practices in health information and technology.

PubMed Articles on Healthcare Administration

PubMed® comprises more than 30 million citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books.

Constituent Organization – Society of Dermatology PAs

The Society of Dermatology PAs offers educational opportunities through its conferences, the Journal of Dermatology for Physician Assistants, and the SDPA Diplomate Fellowship, a training program for PAs in dermatology.

MDLinx – Dermatology

MDLinx scans, sorts, summarizes, and disseminates new literature in dermatology in a digestible form.

Physician Assistants in Dermatology

This 2008 paper published in the Journal of Clinical and Aesthetic Dermatology explores the roles and responsibilities of PAs in Dermatology and highlights how PAs have improved patient access to dermatologic care.

PubMed Articles on Dermatology

PubMed® comprises more than 30 million citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books.

Society of Hospital Medicine

The Society of Hospital Medicine (SHM) provides hospital medicine-specific opportunities, including networking, advocacy and leadership. SHM publishes the Journal of Hospital Medicine, which is the premier publication for the dissemination of research and education for the specialty of hospital medicine.

MDLinx – Hospitalist

MDLinx scans, sorts, summarizes, and disseminates new literature in hospital medicine in a digestible form.

Learning needs of physician assistants working in hospital medicine

This 2012 paper in the Journal of Hospital Medicine provides national data on the self‐perceived learning needs of PA hospitalists.

The role of NPs and PAs in hospital medicine programs

This 2017 paper published in The Hospitalist provides an overview of different hospital program models that leverage advanced practice providers (APPs). The paper also highlights ongoing barriers to maximizing the scope and efficiency of APPs in a hospital setting.

PubMed Articles on Hospital Medicine

PubMed® comprises more than 30 million citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books.

Constituent Organization – Society of PAs in Family Medicine

The Society of PAs in Family Medicine (SPAFM) is an AAPA Constituent Organization that supports AAPA’s knowledge base in family medicine practice issues. SPAFM works to ensure the professional growth, excellence, and recognition of PAs in family medicine and to support their efforts to enable them to improve the quality, accessibility, and cost-effectiveness of patient-centered health care.

Association of Family Practice PAs/NPs

The mission of the Association of Family Practice PAs & NPs is to foster the educational and professional interests of family practice clinicians by promoting clinical and academic excellence and providing a forum for assembling and distributing information important to the profession.

MDLinx – Family Medicine

MDLinx scans, sorts, summarizes, and disseminates new literature in family medicine in a digestible form.

PubMed Articles on Family Medicine

PubMed® comprises more than 30 million citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books.

Physician Assistant Education Association

The Physician Assistant Education Association (PAEA) is a national organization that represents PA educational programs. PAEA publishes the Journal of Physician Assistant Education.

PubMed Articles on Healthcare Education

PubMed® comprises more than 30 million citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books.

The American Academy of Urgent Care Medicine

The American Academy of Urgent Care Medicine (AAUCM) is a society for physicians, physician assistants, and nurse practitioners in urgent care medicine. The AAUCM strives to advance the profession of urgent care medicine through education and training.

Urgent Care Association

The Urgent Care Association (UCA) works to advance the urgent care industry and support urgent care providers through advocacy, education, research, and collaboration. UCA publishes the Journal of Urgent Care Medicine.

PubMed Articles on Urgent Care

PubMed® comprises more than 30 million citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books.

MDLinx – Internal Medicine

MDLinx scans, sorts, summarizes, and disseminates new literature in internal medicine in a digestible form.

PubMed Articles on Internal Medicine

PubMed® comprises more than 30 million citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books.

Constituent Organization – Society of PAs in Emergency Medicine

The Society of PAs in Emergency Medicine (SEMPA) is an AAPA Constituent Organization that supports AAPA’s knowledge base in emergency medicine practice issues. SEMPA strives to advance, protect, and promote the role of PAs in emergency medicine through education, advocacy, collaboration and research.

Implementation of a Physician Assistant Emergency Medicine Residency Within a Physician Residency

Physician assistants (PA) are an important part of emergency department healthcare delivery and are increasingly seeking specialty-specific postgraduate training. This 2020 paper published in the Western Journal of Emergency Medicine presents the outcomes of a pilot program that embedded PA postgraduate training within the existing educational infrastructure of an EM residency program.

Physician Assistants in Emergency Medicine: The Impact of Their Role

This 2010 paper published in the Academic Emergency Medicine journal examines relevant literature published between 1970 and 2009 to assess the role of PAs in patient treatment and the management of emergency services.

MDLink – Emergency Medicine

MDLinx scans, sorts, summarizes, and disseminates new literature in emergency medicine in a digestible form.

PubMed Articles on Emergency Medicine

PubMed® comprises more than 30 million citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books.

PAs in Virtual and Telemedicine

PAVMT is a specialty organization that represents PAs practicing in the rapidly growing field of virtual care and telemedicine.

Leveraging Telemedicine to Promote Safe Prescription Opioid Use

This Allied Against Opioid Abuse blog post written by Desmond Watt, PA-C, highlights how PAs have leveraged telemedicine to advise their patients about the risks and responsibilities of prescription opioid misuse.

Telemedicine for Medicaid & CHIP

Review guidelines from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS).

PAs Are Ready to Lead in Telehealth

This Medscape article written by Amanda Shelley, PA-C, MPAS, explores the legal challenges that PAs face when using telemedicine.

Reperfusion Treatment and Stroke Outcomes in Hospitals With Telestroke Capacity

This 2021 JAMA Neurology paper demonstrates that patients who present to hospitals with telestroke capacity were more likely to receive reperfusion treatment and have lower mortality.

Survey: 83% of Consumers Are Interested in Receiving Virtual Care, But Only 17% Have Access To It

This 2018 Vivify Health survey demonstrates consumer interest in telemedicine and outlines barriers to virtual care adoption.

PubMed Articles on Telemedicine

PubMed® comprises more than 30 million citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books.

Constituent Organization – Society of PAs in Orthopaedic Surgery

The Society of PAs in Orthopaedic Surgery (PAOS) is an AAPA Constituent Organization that supports AAPA’s knowledge base in orthopaedic surgery practice issues. PAOS creates high quality educational programs and a forum for networking, information dissemination, and job placement for PAs in orthopaedics.

American Association of Surgical Physician Assistants

The American Association of Surgical Physician Assistants (AASPA) is a support organization for surgical PAs in all operative settings and specialties who seek to better their careers, their professions, and the quality of patient care.

MDLink – Orthopedics

MDLinx scans, sorts, summarizes, and disseminates new literature in orthopedics in a digestible form.

Blog by Physician Assistants in Orthopaedic Surgery

PAs working in Orthopaedic Surgery may be interested in following this Healio.com blog written by Sam Dyer, PA-C, MHS, and other contributors.

PubMed Articles on Orthopaedic Surgery

PubMed® comprises more than 30 million citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books.

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